He is required to call in a service report for approval to repair, he reported the old springs and the broken door opener, obviously not well maintained (although installed in 1980 and operated until 2018) so the service company denied the claim and the service tech left with $125.00 just for showing up. The service company will no longer cover the door opener.
With garage door installation costs, these numbers also include the actual purchase of the new door and other hardware, including the tracks, adhesives, connectors and fasteners. Keep in mind that if these numbers seem extreme, garage door replacement and upgrades can yield, on average, one of the highest returns on investments for homeowners — with an expected 85 percent.
Garage door springs don’t require extensive care and maintenance. However, they also can’t be left entirely to their own devices. Spraying the springs with WD-40 is a good place to start. It’s also a good idea to check the balance of the garage door every year. To do this, simply lift the garage door up about halfway and let go. If the springs are in good working condition, the door should remain still. If the springs are beginning to weaken, the door might sag or fall. By taking these basic steps, you can preserve your door springs for longer.

Warning! If the door is partially open and crooked, don’t touch it. Period. It’s a sign your door is off balance, and it’s usually caused by a problematic cable. It’s likely the door is still under tension from the spring, and one false move could send a 150-pound door crashing down, causing damage or injury, says Vincent Johnson, owner of Garage Door Doctor of Cypress, Texas. https://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
2. These springs do wear out over time – in fact, they are commonly rated with what is called a cycle life. The average standard cycle life is ten thousand cycles with each cycle being one opening and closing of the door. This means for a door that sees four cycles per day you might expect to replace your springs after somewhere close to seven years of use.
10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode. https://m.youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
If the door closes but then immediately pops open again, you'll need to check the limit settings, which help the mechanism determine how far to move the door in order to close it properly. If the settings are off, the door will hit the ground before the opener believes it should. It will assume that it has hit an obstacle and will automatically backtrack to avoid damage. Check the owner's manual or the buttons on the motor to adjust the limit settings. It may take some trial and error to get the setting just right.

They were quick, friendly, and highly professional. Little things like making me enter security code from the other side of the closed garage door revealed their attention to security They had to run to Home Depot to get a small block of wood to fix an existing problem with the door — They didn’t charge me extra. Quite unexpected & appreciated. 10 out of 10

Garage Door Repair Bracket Centennial Co


With Sears Garage Doors you can feel confident that you are getting the very best for your home and your family. All of our technicians are background checked, professional, and committed to complete customer satisfaction. The "best" is standard for all new Sears Garage Doors, Sears Garage Door Openers and Sears Garage Door Repairs. We offer some of the best warranties available in the industry, the best design advisors, the best technicians, and the best products. We may be a little biased, but we also believe we have the best customers. Go ahead, choose to be part of the best.
10.5 If the spring comes loose from the cone at about 6 turns, you are probably winding the spring backward because the springs are on the wrong sides. Switch the springs. Otherwise, after winding the torsion springs, you will need to stretch the springs and secure the winding cone. First, mark the shaft 1/4" beyond the winding cone with tape or with a file. We stretch the springs because the shaft floats horizontally between the flexible end bearing plates as the garage door operates. Although this may be as little as 1/4" the binding of the coils as the door closes often keeps the door from closing completely, especially when the springs and bearings are dry and need lubrication.
The following procedures are based on my 30 years in the garage door industry. In spite of my high mechanical aptitude, even after 18 years in the trade I lost the end of my left index finger. A few years later I had five stitches in my right thumb, and a year later five stitches in my left thumb. In 2004 emergency room staffs dug steel out of my eye and sewed up my ring finger with eight stitches. The best I can do is help you minimize the risk of injury; that's all I can do for myself. I am not so naive as to think that I have made my last trip to the emergency room. Repairing garage doors, particularly replacing torsion springs, is dangerous work, whether you are a do-it-yourself homeowner or an experienced technician.
"Springs get a lot of wear and tear because they handle the weight of the door," says Paul Cardone, owner of Garage Door Guru in Charlotte, North Carolina. "The type of spring you have depends on the type of door you have — the heavier the door, the more heavy duty the spring. They're full of tension and made of metal, so after so many cycles, they just snap and break."

With Garage Door Doctor, you can rest assured we will replace your springs correctly. We offer 2 types of springs – standard and high cycle. On a 7 foot tall door, our standard torsion springs will last 15,000 cycles and our high cycle torsion springs will last 50,000 cycles. How many years will this last you? That is based off only one thing – usage. For example, with standard torsion spring, if you use your door 4 times a day, you get just over 10 years of life. However, if you use your door 8 times a day, you would get just over 5 years of life. If you use door very little or if you are moving very soon, maybe standard springs would be best for you. If you use your door many times a day or if you don’t plan on moving for a while, high cycle springs would be best for you. Getting high cycle springs will ensure you won’t be stuck with a broken spring for many years to come. Either way, both types of torsion springs we offer work great – its just a matter of when the break again. Call Garage Door Doctor today to have your garage fixed properly!
There are many steps to replacing torsion springs, but overall it's a simple, straightforward process. If you're inclined to attempt it, find a good online video tutorial (preferably done by a garage door pro) that walks you through the entire process, including how to buy the right size of springs. You can also buy new springs and any related parts online, along with the most important items that you need: the two solid-metal winding rods that you use to wind and unwind the torsion springs.
It you have a tilt-up door, you are looking at a $150 – $200 repair or replacement. If it’s a roll-up door it’s going to cost you more. Roll-up door spring repair or replacement is usually around $200 – $250 for a 2 car door. If the brackets need to be disassembled to remove the springs due to the shaft not sliding sideways enough it will cost you an additional $50 – $100.
1. What Is the Issue? _________________________________________________ 2. Have they ever used our service? 3. Are they the homeowner? _________________________________________________ 4. What Date/Time Slot Did They Commit To? 5. Sometimes our technicians Can Run Ahead of Schedule or Behind/Open Availability Outside of Window? 6. IF Customer Was Unable to Commit to Full Time Block, Who Authorized and What Are There Restrictions [This requires approval]. ____________________________________ 7. Is this an overhead garage door or a barrel roll up door? 8. Are you calling about a new work order or existing work order? 9. Is this related to a home warranty claim or insurance claim? 10. Do you live in a gated community?
If you’ve tested and tried to remedy these other problems and you’re still having issues, you may need to reprogram your transmitter. All transmitters have a learn button somewhere on the remote, so first you’ll need to locate that on your transmitter. Press and hold the learn button for a few seconds until the indicator light starts blinking. While the light is blinking, press your remote button again to reprogram that remote.

DIYers are generally steered away from working with torsion springs because installed springs are always under tension. To safely remove a torsion spring, you have to control the tension by holding the spring with a solid metal winding bar, then you loosen the spring from the rod and manually unwind the spring using two winding rods. The spring is potentially dangerous until it is fully unwound. By contrast, extension springs have little or no tension when the garage door is fully open.
9.9 Go to the other side of the garage door and insert the end of the cable into the drum. Rotate the drum until the cable is tight. Slide the drum against the bearing and push the shaft to the right. The marks should line up. If they don't, figure out why and correct the problem. It could be a stuck cable, the garage floor may have shifted, or the vertical angle that helps support the bearing plate may have loosened and shifted. Many garage doors have been installed with a gap between a drum and a bearing plate. The cable drums should always be flush against the race of the bearings.
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