On our EZ-Set Torsion Springs page you will find several options for replacing these springs. We also have step by step instructions for EZ-Set Torsion Spring Replacement. In addition, one of our customers has provided excellent EZ-Set Torsion System instructions for removing the spring without wrecking the winding unit that secures the stationary cone. Instead of a spanner tool, you may prefer to use a pipe wrench or large channel locks to hook the end of the spring and remove it from the cones in the last step.
Remember, a garage door is usually made of metal and pushed along a metal track. That means that lubrication is essential, especially in winter. Keep in mind that lubrication can harden and get gunky as temperatures fall, so make sure that the lubrication on your tracks is rated for the lowest temperature that you’re likely to experience in your part of the world.
Scott was exceptionally polite, professional and knowledgeable. He thoroughly checked my garage door opener, but also inspected the garage door itself and pointed out rust and deterioration that has occurred. Scott then gave me a quote on a new garage door, explaining the installation procedure and quality elements of the new door including the warranty. I was very pleased with the entire service appointment, and my husband and I are seriously considering the new garage door, but only if Scott is the installer! Thanks, Scott!
Sometimes, you’ll notice that your garage door closes all the way and then immediately goes back up instead of staying in the closed position. This issue usually arises with brand new garage doors that were just installed or older models that may need to be reset. If this happens, the most likely culprit is the open and close limit settings of your garage door opener.
Most garage doors from the past 15-20 years have a photo eye which detects if a person or object is blocking the door from lowering all the way. The photo eye will be about 4-6 inches off of the ground for most doors, with an eye that is about the size of a pea. It shoots a laser across the length of the garage that, if interrupted, will cut off the signal used to lower and raise the door.

After removing the old batteries, make sure the plus and minus signs line up with the plus and minus signs on the inside of the transmitter. Otherwise, the new battery won’t work in the transmitter, and it could give you a false sign that something else may be wrong. Once the battery is in place, test the transmitter, and if it works, replace the transmitter door.
10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode. https://m.youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Garage door springs don’t require extensive care and maintenance. However, they also can’t be left entirely to their own devices. Spraying the springs with WD-40 is a good place to start. It’s also a good idea to check the balance of the garage door every year. To do this, simply lift the garage door up about halfway and let go. If the springs are in good working condition, the door should remain still. If the springs are beginning to weaken, the door might sag or fall. By taking these basic steps, you can preserve your door springs for longer.
Order replacement springs. Many manufacturers and distributors only provide torsion springs to professionals, and won’t sell them directly to the customer. Luckily, they are available on the Internet, so search online to find replacement springs. Make sure they match the coil size, length, and interior diameter of the springs you removed. Also, be sure to order both a “left-hand” and a “right-hand” spring as the coils are wound in different directions.[8]

If you’ve tested and tried to remedy these other problems and you’re still having issues, you may need to reprogram your transmitter. All transmitters have a learn button somewhere on the remote, so first you’ll need to locate that on your transmitter. Press and hold the learn button for a few seconds until the indicator light starts blinking. While the light is blinking, press your remote button again to reprogram that remote.

In order to replace your garage door spring(s), you will need to find the current measurements in order to accurately replace the spring(s). This should take about 3 minutes and you don't need to remove the springs or loosen the tension to measure them. Our springs are made to be a bit flexible, so you don't have to get it to an exact measurement. 
Looking to repair your garage door opener? Common problems could range from issues with the remote or wall switch that control the garage door opener to more serious issues like a grinding noise coming from the opener itself. If you need help with repairing your garage opener, schedule a repair appointment today! We repair all major brands and have same-day availability in most markets, so we can get your garage door opener repaired and running smoothly. To learn more about the cost of repairing garage doors, visit our garage door and opener installation and repair cost guide.
CAUTION! Replacing garage door torsion springs is dangerous because the springs are under tension. If you do not use the right tools and follow safe procedures, you could lose hands, limbs or even your life. You could also damage property. We want your business, but not at the expense of your well being. Doing the job right is your responsibility. If you have any doubts about your ability to safely change your springs, we recommend you hire a professional to repair your garage door. Safety First! Then work.
All measurements should be in feet and inches. Step 1, measure across the existing door or desired space for the width, then up and down for the height. The rough opening of your space should be the same size as the door. Step 2, measure the sideroom, which is the space beside your door. Measure the width of the left side, and then the width of the right side. Step 3, measure the space above the door, which is called the headroom. Measure the height of the distance between the top of the door opening and the ceiling. Step 4, measure the ceiling, which is called the backroom. You’ll need to measure the distance of the garage door opening toward the back wall of your garage. You should have 6 total measurements in all once you’ve finished measuring the space. Keep in mind that having an automatic garage door opener installed might call for additional backroom or ceiling space.
Door styles - in addition to the styles just mentioned, it is important to also consider additional features such as windows across the top of the door to provide light inside of the garage, the use of steel or wood frames to give decorative doors added security and stability, and insulation which can reduce energy costs in the attached garage by an impressive 15 to 20%; and
10.3 At this point you will wind the spring. Notice that the end of the spring on the winding cone points up when facing you. You will wind both springs up and counter intuitively as if you are trying to unscrew the winding cones from the ends of the springs. Begin by turning the spring up 1/4 turn until it meets resistance. This is your first quarter turn. Count "one." Next, insert the bar and raise it 90 degrees. Insert the second bar. This is "two." As you wind the spring it should grow in length the thickness of one coil for every turn. The cone should cover your mark after the first couple turns. Many garage door tradesmen mark the torsion springs with chalk or paint, but this often generates confusion.
Next, if you don’t find an obstruction, check the springs. If your door has torsion springs, which are horizontal at the top of the door, you can tell they are broken by checking for a gap between the two springs. If your door has extension springs, you can check by looking to see if they are hanging on the side of the door. If you have a broken spring, you’ll need to call a pro to replace it as this is a dangerous task.
A garage door with aging springs puts an enormous load on a garage door opener, so another sign of failing springs is when you hear the electric door opener begin to strain as it attempts to lift the door. At this point, it is time to consider replacing the springs. Aging door springs can also break suddenly, a situation that can cause the door to slam shut violently. If you happen to be present when a spring breaks, you will hear a very loud sound like a gunshot, because the break usually occurs when the spring is fully loaded—stretched or twisted to its full tension. When one spring breaks, the door will suddenly feel very heavy when you try to open it by hand, and an automatic garage door opener may no longer be able to lift the door at all.
If you are not sure if your door had the correct springs, we recommend that you weigh your door using an analog scale. From my own field experience I would estimate that at least 10% of the doors have the incorrect springs on them. In addition to this, most manufacturers spring their doors using a 20 pound window. We like to improve the garage door balance.
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