Like any mechanical part, garage door springs deteriorate due to normal wear and tear. Over time, the steel that makes up the springs weakens until they eventually break. Under normal circumstances, garage door springs have a life expectancy of 10,000 cycles of opening and closing. This equates to five to seven years, but along the way, there may be signs of problems that can occur before the springs actually stop working.

Garage doors are the largest moving object inside your home. If you have a problematic garage door, it compromises the safety of your family and home. Ankmar Denver is a professional company you can count on. We provide you with quality service at a reasonable price. We offer FREE estimates on replacement garage doors and are spring replacement specialists. 24 hours a day 7 days a week we are your number one garage door repair service.

We couldn't have been happier with the technician. He was prompt, efficient, didn't complain about moving items to do the installation, cleaned up after himself, was polite and thorough. He seemed very sure of exactly what to do next. As a favor, he took a couple of minutes to remove a light globe to replace a bulb since he had the ladder in the garage because we can't get to it. We were very impressed with him. We would definitely request him again.
Another scenario is the garage door goes up very slowly when using the automatic opener. Some garage door openers have DC motors that start off slow when opening and then kick into a higher speed. If you have a broken spring, the opener might stay in the slower speed due to the heavy weight of the garage door. If this happens to you, close the garage door and pull the emergency release rope. Next, try to lift the door. If it is really heavy, then you most likely have a broken garage door spring.
From a big-box store, basic garage door cables can run between $8 and $20, depending on the product. Your pro may charge you a different cost if they provide the cables. Your cables may not need to be replaced if they have simply come off the track, but broken cables will need to be completely removed and replaced. In either instance, the pros will need to secure or take down the door; unwind the springs; reset or replace the rollers, cables, and drums; and then wind the springs once more. For example, a pro could reset cables that have come off the track for $129.99. The average national cost for a garage door repair specialist is $80 - $110 per hour and the typical cost to replace a broken garage door cable is anywhere from $130 to $200.

There are many steps to replacing torsion springs, but overall it's a simple, straightforward process. If you're inclined to attempt it, find a good online video tutorial (preferably done by a garage door pro) that walks you through the entire process, including how to buy the right size of springs. You can also buy new springs and any related parts online, along with the most important items that you need: the two solid-metal winding rods that you use to wind and unwind the torsion springs.
Since most yards entertain play activity including baseballs and other sporting equipment, it's no surprise that garage doors experience broken glass from time to time. Regardless of the cause, it's important to repair glass quickly, since broken glass in a garage is a safety issue, a security problem, and an invitation to every bird and insect in the neighborhood to take up residence in your garage. Fortunately, it's not difficult to replace a pane of glass. The techniques are exactly the same as for replacing glazing in a house window.
Automatic doors require not only the installation of a heavy door, but the motor and cables as well. Automatic doors are much more common now because of their convenience, but in a case such as the heavy wood door, they are a necessity. A strong motor is required to pull up a heavy door. However, automatic doors are not without their faults -- they quickly become a manual door when the power goes out.
6.8 Properly tightened screws will loosen with less than a turn. Once you loosen a set screw, keep at least one bar in the cone AT ALL TIMES until the spring is fully unwound. Many cones have been over-tightened. The spring may unwind 1/4 turn and not unwind any more until one of the set screws is loosened some more. You may need to completely remove the set screws. The shaft may be distorted and the cone still may not unwind at all.
Before we help you diagnose your stuck garage door, safety concerns can't be over stated. When trying to figure out how to fix a stuck garage door, it is important to take every safety precaution. Garage doors weigh hundreds of pounds and torsion springs hold a tremendous amount of energy waiting to be released, so without proper precaution it is possible to hurt yourself attempting to perform unauthorized repairs.
Grab a tape measure and press the hook between two spring coils and note the length of 20 coils. Then measure 40 coils. Convert the measurements to a decimal (4-1/2 in. to 4.5 in., or 4-1/8 to 4.125, for example). Divide the two measurements by 20 and 40 to obtain the spring's wire diameter. Here's an example: 4.50 divided by 20 = .225-in. wire diameter; 9.0 divided by 40 = .225-in. wire diameter. If the two results match, you've measured correctly.

Most residential garage doors have one of two types of springs: torsion or extension. Torsion springs are heavy-duty springs mounted to a metal rod that runs parallel to the door, directly above the door opening. These springs are loaded, or tensioned, with a twisting action. When the door closes, cables attached to the bottom corners of the door pull on pulleys attached to the ends of the metal rod the springs are mounted on. The pulleys turn the rod, which twists the springs and creates tension. When the door is opened, the springs unwind and help lift the door.

Like any mechanical part, garage door springs deteriorate due to normal wear and tear. Over time, the steel that makes up the springs weakens until they eventually break. Under normal circumstances, garage door springs have a life expectancy of 10,000 cycles of opening and closing. This equates to five to seven years, but along the way, there may be signs of problems that can occur before the springs actually stop working.


Lower the door and dismantle it by removing the hardware. Lower a double door by recruiting at least two helpers to help with the weight, and place a 2×4 block under the door to prevent smashing a foot or finger when it’s lowered. Remove the sections one at a time by disconnecting the rollers and brackets. If you have windows, tape them to help control flying shards if they break. Then remove the old roller tracks and remaining hardware.
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