Just like on a bike sprocket, your cables can sometimes become disengaged. Oftentimes, when a torsion spring breaks, the garage door cable will snap as a result. Sometimes, the cable will cause damage to a vehicle or wall, and if a person happens to be in the way of the cable it can cause serious harm. If you cables have snapped, you should call a professional to help you. See the video above.


Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing your knowledge. I just replaced our shower cartridge and our leak is FIXED!!!!!!! Your instructional was clear and concise. I did purchase 2 cartridges first, because I did not know the type it was and could not pull it out without the plastic cover it comes with. Fortunately, it was one of the two. By the way I'm a 63 year old woman. If I can do it, anyone with internet and a little patience and an hour can do it.....
Although garage door springs can break during any season and at any time, they most commonly break during the winter. This has to do with the temperature change. When the temperature sinks below a specific threshold, the metal will contract. This means it’s extremely possible for your door springs to shrink slightly during the winter months. This is hard on the springs and makes them more likely to break.
Door styles - in addition to the styles just mentioned, it is important to also consider additional features such as windows across the top of the door to provide light inside of the garage, the use of steel or wood frames to give decorative doors added security and stability, and insulation which can reduce energy costs in the attached garage by an impressive 15 to 20%; and
2.3 Beware of older winding cones. These older Crawford and McKee torsion spring cones were made for 5/8" bars. Sometimes, however, the holes are too small for 5/8" bars. Whatever you do, don't use a 1/2" bar; instead, grind down a 5/8" bar to fit. I recently had a McKee spring let loose after winding because I used a 1/2" bar when my 5/8" bar wouldn't fit. Just before it let loose I was telling myself, "This is not safe." And it wasn't. The only safe way to replace these older springs is to make a winding bar for each hole of each cone. http://www.youtube.com/embed/Z_eZc-kh40c
There are many steps to replacing torsion springs, but overall it's a simple, straightforward process. If you're inclined to attempt it, find a good online video tutorial (preferably done by a garage door pro) that walks you through the entire process, including how to buy the right size of springs. You can also buy new springs and any related parts online, along with the most important items that you need: the two solid-metal winding rods that you use to wind and unwind the torsion springs.
8.10 Double-check to make sure you have the correct wind on your new torsion spring. On the left side next to the winding cone the end of the spring wire should be pointing up if it is facing you. Notice, also, that the cone is red which usually designates right wind. Customers frequently call and explain that when they get about six turns on the springs they spin on the cones. This is due to installing the springs on the wrong sides of the center bracket. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=mobile
8.10 Double-check to make sure you have the correct wind on your new torsion spring. On the left side next to the winding cone the end of the spring wire should be pointing up if it is facing you. Notice, also, that the cone is red which usually designates right wind. Customers frequently call and explain that when they get about six turns on the springs they spin on the cones. This is due to installing the springs on the wrong sides of the center bracket.
If your garage door is equipped with only one torsion spring, it will be much harder to get your door open. You will need to get 2-3 people to help lift the door up because the full weight can be anywhere from 150 to 300 pounds. We don’t recommend lifting the door when the spring break's due to the danger of it falling on someone. If you absolutely must get your garage door open, raw strength is what you need. When you get the door in the up position, use vise-grips or a c-clamp on the track below the bottom roller to hold the door in the up position.

Every modern garage door is built with a sensor due to a mandate passed by the government back in the 1990’s that required garage door opener manufacturers to install safety devices. To meet this mandate, most garage doors have a sensor installed on each side of the doorway. They are often referred to as photo eyes since their main function is to maintain visual contact with one another. If that visual contact is broken by an obstruction, then the garage door stops in its tracks. This is meant to prevent the garage door from closing on a vehicle – or even worse, a person.

Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing your knowledge. I just replaced our shower cartridge and our leak is FIXED!!!!!!! Your instructional was clear and concise. I did purchase 2 cartridges first, because I did not know the type it was and could not pull it out without the plastic cover it comes with. Fortunately, it was one of the two. By the way I'm a 63 year old woman. If I can do it, anyone with internet and a little patience and an hour can do it..... https://www.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c


These instructions were first posted in 2005, and they were updated in August of 2008. I have been frank about the hazards of garage door repairs and about my own accidents incurred while replacing torsion springs. For what it's worth, you might be surprised to know that I, too, have benefitted from producing these instructions. I have not had any garage door accidents since we first published these on the web in 2005. And, in as much as I have helped keep other DIY-ers out of the emergency room, I consider myself somewhat of a medical practitioner.


Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c

Most homeowners never know they have a broken garage door spring until they try to leave their home. You go in the garage to open the door, push the wall button, and the door only goes up 6”. The reason for this is the garage door opener force or sensitivity has activated, causing the opener to stop pulling the door up. This is a safety feature built into most garage door openers. It is actually a good thing when the open force activates to prevent any damage to your garage door or opener.
Over time, the springs in your garage door can wear down and break. While the average cost to repair garage door springs is between $100 and $200, in some cases you may need to replace them instead. Replacement can cost $20-$30 for springs plus labor which can cost up to $180. Here are some signs to watch out for when determining whether repair or replacement is the right course of action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtu.be
Although garage door springs can break during any season and at any time, they most commonly break during the winter. This has to do with the temperature change. When the temperature sinks below a specific threshold, the metal will contract. This means it’s extremely possible for your door springs to shrink slightly during the winter months. This is hard on the springs and makes them more likely to break. http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Garage door springs don’t require extensive care and maintenance. However, they also can’t be left entirely to their own devices. Spraying the springs with WD-40 is a good place to start. It’s also a good idea to check the balance of the garage door every year. To do this, simply lift the garage door up about halfway and let go. If the springs are in good working condition, the door should remain still. If the springs are beginning to weaken, the door might sag or fall. By taking these basic steps, you can preserve your door springs for longer.
If your garage door is not opening or has become jammed, you may need to replace the garage door cables. Unless you have the proper tools and know-how, this is a job best left to a professional due to the weight of the garage door and the extreme tension of the springs. The cost of repair will vary depending on your location, the length of the cables you need, and the time it takes the pro to do the replacement.
Unlike torsion springs, replacing extension springs has long been given the "green light" for DIYers, primarily because you can complete the job without having to deal with spring tension. The general process is simple and safe: open the door to relieve the spring tension (and secure it open with C-clamps in the tracks); disconnect the spring from the track bracket and the spring pulley, and disconnect the safety cable from one end; install the new spring, reinstall the pulley, and reconnect the safety cable, and you're done.
Garage doors have tension springs and cables that help to slowly and safely lower your door while closing. If these tension springs or cables break, you might find that your garage door closes really fast, often with a loud bang when it hits the ground. This is very dangerous as there is nothing preventing the garage door from crushing something that might be below it. It’s best to call a garage door professional as soon as you can to have them come out and repair these cables or springs.
Our branch in Scottsdale services the garage door needs of the West’s Most Western Town. Plus, we also cover Phoenix; the East Valley areas such as Chandler, Gilbert, Mesaand Tempe as well as Glendale and Peoria in the West Valley; including surrounding areas. When you call us, expect our technicians to arrive promptly and efficiently attend to your garage door needs.
You may remember a time as a kid when you and your siblings would close the garage door and run underneath it as fast as possible to make it out before the door closed. Well, on any garage door installed after 1993, that’s no longer possible thanks to two tiny photo eyes on either side of the garage entrance. These photo eyes transmit an invisible beam between each other that detects if anything is in the garage door’s path when it closes. This safety measure is there to prevent automatic garage doors from closing on top of someone or something and causing serious injury or damage to property.

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Not only was the upward-lifting garage door and the electric garage door opener invented by Overhead Door Corporation’s founder C.G Johnson in the 1920s, but we also have a tradition in excellence for garage door repair, service and maintenance. Even with the most reliable products problems can arise and when they do it’s important to know who to contact to fix these issues while providing solutions to prevent future complications.
Go for the look of wood with less upkeep with low-maintenance faux wood composite & steel garage doors from our Canyon Ridge® & Coachman® Collections. Our Gallery, and Classic Collection garage doors are also available with Ultra-Grain®, a wood look durable paint. If you’re looking for a more traditional look, our Classic™ Collection of steel raised panel and flush panel garage doors complement most home styles. Add one of our many decorative window options to customize the door's appearance and let natural light into your garage.
A garage door with aging springs puts an enormous load on a garage door opener, so another sign of failing springs is when you hear the electric door opener begin to strain as it attempts to lift the door. At this point, it is time to consider replacing the springs. Aging door springs can also break suddenly, a situation that can cause the door to slam shut violently. If you happen to be present when a spring breaks, you will hear a very loud sound like a gunshot, because the break usually occurs when the spring is fully loaded—stretched or twisted to its full tension. When one spring breaks, the door will suddenly feel very heavy when you try to open it by hand, and an automatic garage door opener may no longer be able to lift the door at all.
With Sears Garage Doors you can feel confident that you are getting the very best for your home and your family. All of our technicians are background checked, professional, and committed to complete customer satisfaction. The "best" is standard for all new Sears Garage Doors, Sears Garage Door Openers and Sears Garage Door Repairs. We offer some of the best warranties available in the industry, the best design advisors, the best technicians, and the best products. We may be a little biased, but we also believe we have the best customers. Go ahead, choose to be part of the best.

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8.10 Double-check to make sure you have the correct wind on your new torsion spring. On the left side next to the winding cone the end of the spring wire should be pointing up if it is facing you. Notice, also, that the cone is red which usually designates right wind. Customers frequently call and explain that when they get about six turns on the springs they spin on the cones. This is due to installing the springs on the wrong sides of the center bracket.

Safe automatic door openers. All automatic openers must now have an auto-reversing mechanism and photoelectric eyes located near the floor on both sides of the door (see photo). If the door is closing and the beam between the eyes is interrupted, the door will automatically reverse. If the eyes aren’t connected, the door won’t operate. For instructions on how to install a new garage door opener, see How to Install a Garage Door Opener.
My wife and I began having our custom home built in the fall of 2002. We were able to subcontract many phases of the build process & we did all the painting. A highlight of the building experience was choosing precast concrete basement walls (produced in a controlled environment) and installed with great results by one of the TOH partners (Superior Walls). We got that idea based on watching a TOH episode on PBS a few years prior. It was quite the sight for our neighbors and us as the oversize flat bed truck arrived with an overhead crane and began the process of wall installation. It was kind of scary as the the wall sections were put in place. But without the TOH episode and the TOH seal of approval giving us confidence for the precast walls we would have chosen having the concrete walls poured on site. We have uncertain weather conditions here in Western NY during the late fall season. Who knows how pouring the walls on site would have gone. Thank you TOH for the precast wall episodes.

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Center and level the first section after you install the brackets. The door must be level even if the floor isn’t, so use shims under the section to level it. The rubber gasket on the bottom section will fill the gaps created by an unlevel floor. To hold the level in place, tape it to the section. To hold the section in place, lightly toenail a 16d nail into the frame and bend it over the section. Add brackets and rollers before setting them in place and stack one section on top of another, toenailing as you go up.
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