Luckily, there is a bit of science to questions of garage door repair and replacement. That’s why we’ve put together this guide on when to replace a garage door. We’ll prepare you to compare repair vs replacement garage door costs. We’ll discuss the ways in which repairs are the most affordable option while also exploring those moments when replacement will in the end provide you with more value added.
We also have a wide range of expertise repairing and installing both residential and commercial doors, meaning we can tackle any problem, large or small. We carry a wide range of doors from one of the industry’s leading manufacturers, Clopay, so you can make the choice that makes the most sense for your home and family while feeling confident that you are getting a door of the highest quality. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop

Containment cables. When old extension springs break, the springs and cables become heavy whips that damage cars and even injure people. To solve the whipping problem, manufacturers now offer containment cables that run through the center of side-mounted extension springs. If you have extension springs and don’t plan to replace your door, make sure the springs have these containment cables, or have a professional install them.


Although garage door springs can break during any season and at any time, they most commonly break during the winter. This has to do with the temperature change. When the temperature sinks below a specific threshold, the metal will contract. This means it’s extremely possible for your door springs to shrink slightly during the winter months. This is hard on the springs and makes them more likely to break.
NEVER use screwdrivers, pin punches or pliers handles to wind or unwind a torsion spring. Trust us: This is the best way to wind up in the hospital. Don't even think about doing this job without a proper set of winding bars. You can buy a set of professional hardened-steel winding bars for about $25 from online suppliers. (Garagedoorpartsusa.com and stardoorparts.com are two online sources that sell winding bars, springs and other parts.) Professional winding bars work with 1/2-in. and 7/16-in. winding cones. If your winding cones have 1/2-in. openings, you can make your own winding bars by cutting a 36-in. length of 1/2-in.-diameter round bar stock in half (buy round bar stock from any hardware or home center). Just file a smooth bevel on each end so it slides into the winding cone holes easier.
Weather conditions can make rails expand or contract slightly, which requires a little extra pressure from the opener to compensate. Turning the force-adjustment screw increases or decreases the force. However, adjusting the force is not something to play around with unless you are confident you know what you’re doing. The force adjustment signals the opener to stop and reverse when objects are detected in the closing path. Too little force and just about anything will trigger it to stop, but too much force and the garage door might not respond to resistance from something or someone in the path when the door is trying to close.
Once the lock switch has been activated, you can only control the garage door via the wall control unit. You may have forgotten to de-activate it after coming home from an extended period away, which is why the garage door seems to be stuck whenever you attempt to use your remote. Check to see if this is the case and simply unlock your remotes by pressing the lock switch again.

Garage Door Repair How Much Centennial Co 80015


When you're done watching this video you'll know how to determine whether the company you hired to replace your garage door spring installed the right size spring on your door. You'll also learn the consequences to your garage door opener if the wrong size spring is used. If you are having a problem with your garage door spring, the 2:30 minutes you spend watching this video is time will spent.

We also have a wide range of expertise repairing and installing both residential and commercial doors, meaning we can tackle any problem, large or small. We carry a wide range of doors from one of the industry’s leading manufacturers, Clopay, so you can make the choice that makes the most sense for your home and family while feeling confident that you are getting a door of the highest quality.
If your garage door's spring breaks, stops working properly, or snaps, you'll lose the ability to open and close your garage door. This could happen due to a variety of issues, like normal wear and tear or from extreme temperature changes in a short amount of time. Spring replacements require a quick response from a garage door provider near you. Contact The Home Depot and a local, background-checked technician will respond within 24 hours. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtu.be
10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode. https://m.youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
2.3 Beware of older winding cones. These older Crawford and McKee torsion spring cones were made for 5/8" bars. Sometimes, however, the holes are too small for 5/8" bars. Whatever you do, don't use a 1/2" bar; instead, grind down a 5/8" bar to fit. I recently had a McKee spring let loose after winding because I used a 1/2" bar when my 5/8" bar wouldn't fit. Just before it let loose I was telling myself, "This is not safe." And it wasn't. The only safe way to replace these older springs is to make a winding bar for each hole of each cone.
Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Through our garage door configurator by Clopay, you can design, visualize and purchase a new Clopay garage door. Upload a photo of your home and then browse the configurator to see which style works for you. Choose from a variety of designs, textures, colors, finishes, window options and decorative hardware. You’re able to easily and quickly see the transformation, and then make it a reality.
Extension springs last 15,000 cycles. Every time the door goes up and down is one cycle. On average extension springs will last 7 to 12 years. For most people, you know you need to replace your extension springs because it snaps. Sometimes, however, when extension springs get older, they can lose their tension and the spring becomes elongated. This is rare but it does still happen. Basically, the coils are fatigued and when the door is up you can see gaps where the spring is not relaxing properly. When this happens, the spring is useless. It is best to replace the springs at this point rather than overworking the opener which will cause it to last a shorter life.
Refrain from parking your car in the garage until the garage door is repaired. Additionally, try not to open and close the door while it’s in this condition. With that amount of possible force coming from the springs or cables, they could potentially damage your vehicle or other property in the garage as well as cause serious injury. It’s especially important that you and your family stay away from these cables or springs until everything is repaired.
The garage door opens and closes many times throughout the year, and something may blow inside. While it is usually something such as loose leaves or small amounts of dirt, the rails that the door travel along can collect this loose debris. Over time, the buildup of debris creates a blockage on the rails. Note where on the rails the door is stuck and clean that area. If children use the garage to leave the house, it's sometimes something as simple as a small, bouncing ball that happens to land in just the right -- or wrong -- spot.
If you pull the red emergency release rope on your automatic opener and you still can’t lift the garage door, you probably have a broken spring. The counterbalance spring is what lifts the garage door, not the garage door opener. If the spring is broken, the door is dead weight. A garage door can be lifted, but it is going to require some muscle to get it up. It is also important to lift the door evenly so it does not jam in the tracks.
Our garage door broke 3 days before Christmas, trapping my car inside. We contacted our home warranty, and within 24 hours, Sears called with an appointment time for the next day! I was so impressed! I thought, for sure, with the holidays, we would have to wait. When the technician showed up, he was so friendly. Unfortunately, the repair was not covered under our warranty, but he was able to help us get a good deal on a new spring and still make the repairs that day before he left. He also gave us great advice on how to keep the spring lubricated so it would not break again. I felt like he really went above and beyond to provide great service. Since moving into this new house in August, we have used Sears for several things now, and have been very pleased with the service. It's nice to see that in an age when so many companies just put customer service on the back burner in order to meet their bottom line, Sears still really cares and makes their customers feel important. Thanks for taking care of us this Christmas! http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=kp
Home Depot local Service Providers are background checked, insured, licensed and/or registered. License or registration numbers held by or on behalf of Home Depot U.S.A., Inc. are available at homedepot.com/licensenumbers or at the Special Services Desk in The Home Depot store. State specific licensing information includes: AL 51289, 1924; AK 25084; AZ ROC252435, ROC092581; AR 228160518; CA 602331; CT HIC.533772; DC 420214000109, 410517000372; FL CRC046858, CGC1514813; GA RBCO005730, GCCO005540; HI CT-22120; ID RCE-19683; IA C091302; LA 43960, 557308, 883162; MD 85434, 42144; MA 112785, CS-107774; MI 2101089942, 2102119069; MN BC147263; MS 22222-MC; MT 37730; NE 26085; NV 38686; NJ 13VH09277500; NM 86302; NC 31521; ND 29073; OR 95843; The Home Depot U.S.A., Inc. is a Registered General Contractor in Rhode Island and its Registration Number is 9480; SC GLG110120; TN 47781; UT 286936-5501; VA 2705-068841; WA HOMED088RH; WV WV036104; WI 1046796.
However, if after checking every other possibility, you still have a communication issue between your remote and your motor, it’s time to call in a professional. They have both the expertise and the specialized equipment to properly diagnose a wide range of motor sensor issues and will be able to help you take the next steps in either repairing your motor or having it replaced.
There’s nothing more frustrating than attempting to open or close your garage door only to find that it simply won’t budge. In some cases, your garage door may even open or close halfway only to get stuck in the process. The very first thing that you should do if your garage door seems to be stuck is to check the batteries in your remote. You’d be surprised at how often this is the root of the trouble. If dead batteries were not the issue, then use the following four tips to further troubleshoot your garage door.

Homeowners have long been warned that torsion springs are extremely dangerous to work with and that replacing them must be left to a professional. But these claims are somewhat exaggerated. If you understand how they work, and you pay attention to what you're doing, you can replace them safely and surprisingly easily. Granted, they're a little spooky to work with at first (partly due to their reputation), but this is a good thing—you really don't want to forget that they're under tension. Thinking about every step — before you take it — is the key to staying safe.
Sometimes, you’ll notice that your garage door closes all the way and then immediately goes back up instead of staying in the closed position. This issue usually arises with brand new garage doors that were just installed or older models that may need to be reset. If this happens, the most likely culprit is the open and close limit settings of your garage door opener. http://m.youtube.com/embed/Z_eZc-kh40c
However, if after checking every other possibility, you still have a communication issue between your remote and your motor, it’s time to call in a professional. They have both the expertise and the specialized equipment to properly diagnose a wide range of motor sensor issues and will be able to help you take the next steps in either repairing your motor or having it replaced.
While a sudden issue is usually easily repaired, a consistent issue that has gone unaddressed for months or years will likely require a total replacement. The problem is that garage doors have a number of heavy, powerful moving parts. If the door is working as it is designed, it can open and close hundreds and hundreds of times without issues. However, if there is even a small issue in the lifting mechanism that repeatedly influences the movement of the door, you will soon find that the damage caused over those hundreds of lifts can’t be fixed.
1. Garage door springs do almost all of the work of lifting your door regardless of the door being manually or automatically operated. The spring makes it possible for anyone to lift a product that might weigh one hundred pounds on the low end and many hundreds of pounds on the high end. Not only can anyone lift it – most can do it with one hand! In other words, the garage door spring does a lot of work.
Eric Jonas has been writing in small-business advertising and local community newsletters since 1998. Prior to his writing career, he became a licensed level II gas technician and continues to work in the field, also authoring educational newsletters for others in the business. Jonas is currently a graduate student with a Bachelor of Arts in English and rhetoric from McMaster University.
11.2b If the springs you installed are too strong, and if you wind the springs the correct number of turns, the door will not stay down nor half way. The garage door will be hard to close. DO NOT REMOVE MORE THAN HALF A TURN OF SPRING TENSION TO CORRECT THE PROBLEM. Here's why. If you remove 3/4 of a turn to get the door to stay closed, and then if you open the door, it will get heavier as you open the door, and once open, the cables will come off the drums. This could create as much as a day's extra work. It could also cause door damage and/or result in serious injury. Do not use the door! Get different springs!

Your springs may be broken. There are two different types of springs. If your garage door springs are located horizontally at the top of your garage door then it is called a torsion spring. You should check for a gap in between the springs to indicate if they are broken. If your springs are located at either side of your garage door, they are called extension springs. Look to see if a piece of them is hanging on the side of your garage door to indicate if those are broken. If your garage door springs are broken then replacing them is a dangerous process if you have never done it before so you should seek a professional to repair or replace them.
Whether you need a new garage door spring, a damaged door panel replaced, a new opener installed or a track or rollers replaced, with over 25 years experience in the garage door repair business, I can get it done for you.  Many customers are also happy to know that all the garage door springs I use are not only "Made in the USA", they're made right here in Arizona!  We like to keep things local, and we hope you will do the same when you need a garage door repair for your home.
The springs are an essential component to your garage door in that they enable the door to be lifted or lowered easily, despite its weight. If either of the springs are broken, then the door will become stuck. There are two types of garage door springs – torsion springs and extension springs. Torsion springs are located near the top of the door, whereas extension springs are located on each side of the door. If your garage door uses torsion springs, check for a gap between the springs to identify whether they are broken. If you have extension springs, look to see if a piece of the springs are hanging from the side.

If you’ve tested and tried to remedy these other problems and you’re still having issues, you may need to reprogram your transmitter. All transmitters have a learn button somewhere on the remote, so first you’ll need to locate that on your transmitter. Press and hold the learn button for a few seconds until the indicator light starts blinking. While the light is blinking, press your remote button again to reprogram that remote.
Installing an overhead garage door requires a few tools and a friend to help. First, the lower door panel needs to be set up in the center of the doorway. The remaining panels and tracks are held in place with hinges, brackets, and screws. Set up an easy-to-install torsion spring system to ensure that your door lifts properly for many years to come.

Overhead Door Company of Dallas/Fort Worth is North Texas' official Overhead Door distributor. For over 50 years we have been providing quality residential and commercial garage doors and fast and dependable garage door repair service not only to Dallas and Fort Worth, but to all cities in the DFW Metroplex. We are dedicated to 100% customer satisfaction.
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