On our EZ-Set Torsion Springs page you will find several options for replacing these springs. We also have step by step instructions for EZ-Set Torsion Spring Replacement. In addition, one of our customers has provided excellent EZ-Set Torsion System instructions for removing the spring without wrecking the winding unit that secures the stationary cone. Instead of a spanner tool, you may prefer to use a pipe wrench or large channel locks to hook the end of the spring and remove it from the cones in the last step.

Garage Door Repair Estimates Centennial 80015


Received all items as indicated, I would recommend purchasing a metal center bearing also, other Than the plastic that this comes with. Install was easy and strait forward. hardest part was finding how many turns to tighten those springs?? I used a general rule of thumb of a full turn for every ft. Of door. 4 quarter turns equals 1 full turn. I found that 26 balanced the door perfectly. These springs seem a little smaller than what was there however, the coil itself is the same. (Pic) After installing, I recommend oiling the springs with some motor oil. This will help with rust and noise. Good luck with yours, it's worth the work for the saving!!
In this article, we’ll tell you the difference between a safe door and one that’s unsafe. We’ll also give you the helpful tips you’re not likely to find in the manufacturer’s instructions to correctly, and safely, install a new garage door with a torsion spring and do-it-yourself tensioning. Installing a new, double garage door yourself will save you several hundred dollars and should take eight to 12 hours if you’re fairly handy. You can do most of the new garage door installation project yourself, but you should recruit help for removing the old door.

Install the vertical roller tracks first by wrapping the curved lip around the rollers. The top of these tracks should be approximately 8 in. below the top of the top section. Wait to install the upper tracks until this step is complete. Check the level of the top section to make sure the tops of the vertical roller tracks are level with each other. The bottom of the roller tracks should be at least 1/8 in. off the concrete floor. After leveling and mounting these tracks, install the upper roller (horizontal) tracks. 

Before we help you diagnose your stuck garage door, safety concerns can't be over stated. When trying to figure out how to fix a stuck garage door, it is important to take every safety precaution. Garage doors weigh hundreds of pounds and torsion springs hold a tremendous amount of energy waiting to be released, so without proper precaution it is possible to hurt yourself attempting to perform unauthorized repairs.
Usually, when a garage door spring breaks the door has already closed or come down. In some instances, however, a spring can snap while the door is closing or in motion, causing the door to fall rapidly. In these situations, the door can become a safety concern for you and your family, so you should keep your distance and call a garage door professional as soon as possible. Garage doors are very heavy and can cause injury if not handled properly. When a garage door problem occurs, call a Sears Garage Door expert to help.
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Remove the clamps and pliers from the torsion tube and track, and lift the door about 3 ft. by hand. If the door springs are properly adjusted, the door should stay in place when you let go. If the door falls when you let go, add a quarter turn to each spring. Repeat if necessary. If the door continues to open on its own, release spring tension in quarter-turn increments until the door stays in place when you let go. Then reconnect the opener.
While a sudden issue is usually easily repaired, a consistent issue that has gone unaddressed for months or years will likely require a total replacement. The problem is that garage doors have a number of heavy, powerful moving parts. If the door is working as it is designed, it can open and close hundreds and hundreds of times without issues. However, if there is even a small issue in the lifting mechanism that repeatedly influences the movement of the door, you will soon find that the damage caused over those hundreds of lifts can’t be fixed.
Everyone wants to save money. Unfortunately, there are some areas you just can’t skimp on. This includes garage door springs. As much as it might be tempting to by smaller or cheaper springs, or maybe to buy one spring where two are needed, these attempts to save money will only end up costing more money in the end. When you buy the proper springs, they’ll last for years. When you cut corners to save money, the springs will wear out faster, meaning they’ll need to be replaced much sooner.
Like any mechanical part, garage door springs deteriorate due to normal wear and tear. Over time, the steel that makes up the springs weakens until they eventually break. Under normal circumstances, garage door springs have a life expectancy of 10,000 cycles of opening and closing. This equates to five to seven years, but along the way, there may be signs of problems that can occur before the springs actually stop working.
If the door opens this way, then there’s probably something wrong with the garage door opener. It’s a good idea to make sure the opener is plugged into its nearby power outlet. Also, make sure the circuit breaker for the garage door opener hasn’t flipped to the “OFF” position. If it has, then there may be an electrical issue that your garage door specialist should check out.
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