Extension springs last 15,000 cycles. Every time the door goes up and down is one cycle. On average extension springs will last 7 to 12 years. For most people, you know you need to replace your extension springs because it snaps. Sometimes, however, when extension springs get older, they can lose their tension and the spring becomes elongated. This is rare but it does still happen. Basically, the coils are fatigued and when the door is up you can see gaps where the spring is not relaxing properly. When this happens, the spring is useless. It is best to replace the springs at this point rather than overworking the opener which will cause it to last a shorter life.
Extension springs last 15,000 cycles. Every time the door goes up and down is one cycle. On average extension springs will last 7 to 12 years. For most people, you know you need to replace your extension springs because it snaps. Sometimes, however, when extension springs get older, they can lose their tension and the spring becomes elongated. This is rare but it does still happen. Basically, the coils are fatigued and when the door is up you can see gaps where the spring is not relaxing properly. When this happens, the spring is useless. It is best to replace the springs at this point rather than overworking the opener which will cause it to last a shorter life.

Replacement spring procedure took me exactly 1 hours including preparation and clean-up for double aluminum garage door. Watch the DIY video on Youtube, save $$, be careful with winding the torsion springs. Rule of thumb: 7' height door garage= 7' x 4 (each 1/4 turn) + 1 = 29 turns (1/4 turn), 8' height door garage = 8' x 4 + 1 = 33 turns (1/4 turn), and so on.... https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
The following instructions for replacing garage door springs are for do-it-yourself homeowners and for maintenance repair men who service their smaller commercial or industrial sectional overhead doors. These directions are designed for torsion springs mounted to both sides of an anchor bracket above the middle of the garage door as pictured above. Instructions for replacing a single torsion spring, for replacing garage door extension springs, and for replacing Wayne Dalton Torquemaster springs are linked to our DIY Instructions page above. You'll also find a link for any other garage door parts you may need while repairing your door.
Slide the left spring onto the tube and add the cable drum. When your new springs arrive, put the new left spring (the 1 with the end facing up and to the left) on the torsion tube, making sure that the stationary cone on the end of the spring faces the center bracket. After sliding the new spring into place, replace the cable drum and insert the torsion bar into the left bearing bracket.[9]
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