We live in a recently completed townhouse that was built with double-wall construction. That construction method was touted by the builder as what would keep sound from penetrating between the units. But we can hear the next door neighbors' TV and stereo, and sometimes voices and even snoring, through the wall. While sometimes it's the volume, mostly it's the bass sounds coming through the wall. They say they don't hear us, but we keep our bass turned down. They crank up the bass, and they are not going to change that. They also are not going to do anything construction-wise to help from their side. What is the best way for us to try to block the low frequency/bass sounds from penetrating the existing wall into our side?
My wife and I began having our custom home built in the fall of 2002. We were able to subcontract many phases of the build process & we did all the painting. A highlight of the building experience was choosing precast concrete basement walls (produced in a controlled environment) and installed with great results by one of the TOH partners (Superior Walls). We got that idea based on watching a TOH episode on PBS a few years prior. It was quite the sight for our neighbors and us as the oversize flat bed truck arrived with an overhead crane and began the process of wall installation. It was kind of scary as the the wall sections were put in place. But without the TOH episode and the TOH seal of approval giving us confidence for the precast walls we would have chosen having the concrete walls poured on site. We have uncertain weather conditions here in Western NY during the late fall season. Who knows how pouring the walls on site would have gone. Thank you TOH for the precast wall episodes.
All measurements should be in feet and inches. Step 1, measure across the existing door or desired space for the width, then up and down for the height. The rough opening of your space should be the same size as the door. Step 2, measure the sideroom, which is the space beside your door. Measure the width of the left side, and then the width of the right side. Step 3, measure the space above the door, which is called the headroom. Measure the height of the distance between the top of the door opening and the ceiling. Step 4, measure the ceiling, which is called the backroom. You’ll need to measure the distance of the garage door opening toward the back wall of your garage. You should have 6 total measurements in all once you’ve finished measuring the space. Keep in mind that having an automatic garage door opener installed might call for additional backroom or ceiling space.

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If your garage door track is out of alignment, it can be a serious issue. The metal track your door runs on needs to be aligned properly in order for your door to move. If you see gaps between the rollers and rail, or bends in the rails themselves, you have a problem. The heavy weight of the door can compound these issues and make them worse until it becomes dangerous to operate your door.
If you use the correct tools and follow our instructions, you can rebuild the entire torsion spring system in just a few hours, without any side trips to the ER. We won't cover how to replace garage door extension spring systems in this story. But we'll show you garage door spring replacement on the more common torsion springs, the kind that mount on a bar above the garage door.
The new opener was installed yesterday and today for a while it wouldn't close properly. The customer service representative said they will probably have to reverse the sensors. However, no one could come out today (Friday) or tomorrow. She will call me by Tuesday of next week to schedule someone to come here. The customer service rep. and the technician were nice but as of now, my new garage opener is not working to my satisfaction. 

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	10.5 If the spring comes loose from the cone at about 6 turns, you are probably winding the spring backward because the springs are on the wrong sides. Switch the springs. Otherwise, after winding the torsion springs, you will need to stretch the springs and secure the winding cone. First, mark the shaft 1/4" beyond the winding cone with tape or with a file. We stretch the springs because the shaft floats horizontally between the flexible end bearing plates as the garage door operates. Although this may be as little as 1/4" the binding of the coils as the door closes often keeps the door from closing completely, especially when the springs and bearings are dry and need lubrication.

First and foremost, a garage door, by design, contains springs designed to balance your door and make it easier to lift. Those springs are under incredible amounts of tension. If a spring breaks or is improperly released, it can cause incredible and potentially fatal injuries. Keep in mind, when working on a garage door spring, it is likely that your face and head will be close to it, meaning that your most sensitive area will be in the direct path of the released spring.
Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires. https://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtu.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
You can choose from three basic types of steel door: (1) steel only; (2) steel with insulation on the inside; and (3) steel on both sides with 1-3/8 to 2 in. of insulation. Other features that add to the cost are thicker insulation and windows, especially insulated windows. The do-it-yourself tensioning systems also add a little to the door’s cost. Be sure to specify exactly what you want.
The average cost is $190 for 2 springs in the Detroit area. This is for steel doors weighing under 140 lbs or known as a standard spring which fits 90% of all doors. The remaining 10% are wood doors or large heavy insulated doors. Expect to pay an additional $60 - $100 for a set of these. Garage Door Companies rarely carry these springs on their vehicles or stock them. Therefore, they either buy them locally at a premium or special order them. Regardless, its an additional trip that gets figured into the cost.
Both types of springs are _loaded_, or under tension, when the door is closed. This gives them stored energy to help lift the door as it's being opened. When the door is all the way up, the springs are relaxed, or relatively so—they still may be under some tension. The mechanical difference between extension and torsion springs is that extension springs are loaded by stretching, or elongating, while torsion springs are loaded by twisting, creating torque.
4. It is also important to note that extension springs sometimes do not break but rather ‘stretch out’. This is easy to spot as the space between coils when the door is closed is normally consistent. When the spring fails without breaking the space between the coils will become very inconsistent. This condition is quite visible and if it exists the springs should be replaced (Know when to call quits with your garage door). 
So we’ve put together a guide for all of those who are knee deep in snow, furious because their garage door is not opening or won’t close which will cause garage door problems when it is cold.  If you suspect that you’re suffering from a garage door opener not working in cold weather, look through our troubleshooting tips in order to figure out if this is a small issue you can take care of yourself or if you’re experiencing a more serious problem that should be left to a professional!
4.4 Take the spring on the left and place it at the left end of the door as pictured here. Notice that the end of the wire points to the right toward the center of the door. This is a right wind torsion spring. It will go above the garage door on the left side of the spring anchor bracket. The winding cone at the other end of this spring is usually painted red.
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I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts? 
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