Garage door springs offset the weight of a garage door and allow the door to be opened and closed easily, either by hand or by an automatic garage door opener. The high-tension steel in the springs has a limited lifespan, and over time, the springs lose their effectiveness. Garage door springs come in levels of quality—they may be described as "10,000-use" or "20,000-use" springs, for example. This may sound like a very large number, but when you consider that a garage door might be opened four or five times a day, every day, every year, it becomes clear that there is a limited lifespan for these critical garage door parts.

6.1 It is time now to unwind the old spring that is not broken. A few warnings are in order. NEVER, NEVER, NEVER touch a set screw without first inserting a properly fitting bar into the winding cone! Also, do not use box or socket wrenches for the set screws. If the cone slips, the wrench could break your hand in 10 spots before unwinding completely. It's my guess that this is the number one cause of trips to the emergency room for inexperienced homeowners fixing or replacing their springs.


Whenever a spring breaks, the door will not go up. Attempting to lift a door with a broken spring can be extremely dangerous. Attempting to replace the springs yourself is even more dangerous. You should never attempt to fix a broken spring yourself – only experienced, trained professionals should ever touch torsion springs. Also replacing a spring requires expertise to know exactly which spring to replace it with. The correct springs are determined based off the weight of the door. There are hundreds of combinations of springs but only one is correct for your door. It is important to have the correct springs to prevent an array of problems in the future. With the wrong springs, your opener will break much quicker and your door is more likely to come off tracks. It is alarming how many installers use the wrong size springs. Knowing which springs to use can only be determined by experience.
9.9 Go to the other side of the garage door and insert the end of the cable into the drum. Rotate the drum until the cable is tight. Slide the drum against the bearing and push the shaft to the right. The marks should line up. If they don't, figure out why and correct the problem. It could be a stuck cable, the garage floor may have shifted, or the vertical angle that helps support the bearing plate may have loosened and shifted. Many garage doors have been installed with a gap between a drum and a bearing plate. The cable drums should always be flush against the race of the bearings. https://www.youtube.com/attribution_link?a=Z_eZc-kh40c&u=watch?v=XXXXXX&feature=share
Replacement spring procedure took me exactly 1 hours including preparation and clean-up for double aluminum garage door. Watch the DIY video on Youtube, save $$, be careful with winding the torsion springs. Rule of thumb: 7' height door garage= 7' x 4 (each 1/4 turn) + 1 = 29 turns (1/4 turn), 8' height door garage = 8' x 4 + 1 = 33 turns (1/4 turn), and so on.... https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
SNAP... bang... boom. That is the sound of a garage door torsion spring breaking. It can be a very loud noise that sounds like a firecracker or gunshot. Springs are rated for a certain number of cycles and are the first thing that will break in your garage door assembly. Broken springs are the #1 source of customer calls for garage door repair companies. If you have a broken spring, you should NEVER try to open the door, as it can be very dangerous. This repair should be left to a professional or someone with the right tools and skills.
Garage Door Installation – This includes the installation of a new garage door. Includes the door itself, the track, cables, springs, hinges, handles, locks and rollers. It is the complete service and installation of a new door. We inspect all the parts, make adjustments to fit your garage opening, and service all elements during the installation process. Plus, we check to ensure all parts are in proper working order after installed.
Lewis did a great job and not only met my expectations but blew them away. His attention to detail was impressive. He reolaced the springs on my two car garage door and he went out of his way to adjust the tension on my second single car garage door to make it open better. He also recommended replacement of the rollers on my main garage door as they were getting pretty worn out and making some noise. He was very friendly and personable. Was willing to explain what he was doing so we could learn something too. I would recommend Lewis Nagy if you are in his area here in Apollo Beach/Riverview. Thanks again!
The tricky parts of the job involve you carrying the tension of the spring. Replacing a spring requires that you first unwind the spring to relieve the tension, then wind it back up and secure it while it's under tension. Winding bars are used for all winding and unwinding actions—don't try to save a few bucks by substituting long screwdrivers or pieces of rebar for the real winding bars. Substitute tools are much more likely to slip, or they may bend or break under the load of the spring.

Homeowners have long been warned that torsion springs are extremely dangerous to work with and that replacing them must be left to a professional. But these claims are somewhat exaggerated. If you understand how they work, and you pay attention to what you're doing, you can replace them safely and surprisingly easily. Granted, they're a little spooky to work with at first (partly due to their reputation), but this is a good thing—you really don't want to forget that they're under tension. Thinking about every step — before you take it — is the key to staying safe.

A garage door spring replacement should cost between $175 and $225 for a single tension spring and between $250 and $300 for two tension springs. Most garage door companies carry a wide enough variety of spring sizes to cover most residential doors. As long as the proper amount of turns are put on the spring, there are more than one correct springs to use for any one door.
Once you’ve decided it’s time to replace your garage door — whether the result of malfunctions or just seeking to modernize your home’s exteriors — you may be wondering how much a garage door replacement costs. While these numbers are often determined by several factors, including the materials and labor involved, on average, a garage door replacement can cost just over $1,000 but could range from about $300 to over $2,000.

One of the best ways to care for your springs is to check them over for wear. You can certainly look at them for damage, but sometimes the damage isn’t something that’s visible. In these cases, try lifting the garage door up from the ground. About halfway up, let go. If the door stays, the springs are still working perfectly. If the door sags or drops at all, this could be a sign that your springs are beginning to weaken and will need replacing soon.
The cost to repair a garage door is typically more affordable than installing a new garage door. Often, a garage door repair simply requires fixing a broken spring. The average cost to repair a garage door spring is $180, but prices range from $100 to $350 if the installer must disassemble the brackets to reach the springs. Common garage door repairs include lubricating or balancing the springs and installing safety cables that work as a backup for an extension spring system. Most homeowners can lubricate the springs on their own for the cost of the lubricant ($5 to $6), but many garage door contractors include lubrication services as part of their maintenance plans. Refitting existing springs to balance the door requires between 45 to 90 minutes to complete, with a price tag ranging from $75 to $110. Safety cable installation costs between $150 and $200.
When you hire a professional, the first thing they will do is turn off the power as a safety precaution.  They will then measure the existing door springs to make sure the new springs they order or have in stock fit accordingly.  With these new springs, they will unwind the existing springs and install the new ones in its place, tightening them with screws.  When tightened, the springs will be balanced, lubricated and the springs will be wound up.  Lastly, the door will be tested and the tracks will be lubricated to move efficiently.
On average, to have your springs replaced on your garage door will vary anywhere from $200 to as much as $400 if you were to hire a professional.  Breaking the costs down, the springs, depending on the part needed and the size, will cost about $20 to $60 each.  Add in the labor, which can be $45 to $85 per hour, depending on your location, can bring the grand total to the estimate noted.   A tilt-up door, on average, will be about 20 to 30 percent less than a roll-up door. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c

If your photo eyes are clean and the door still isn’t closing, the next thing you’ll need to do is check the alignment of the eyes. The eyes should be pointing in exactly the same direction and at the same angle. If they’re off, they won’t register that the other one is there, and it’ll assume something is in its path, causing the door to stay in the open position. When checking the alignment, measure the height of each photo eye from the ground. Use a level to make sure they’re pointing directly across at each other at the same angle. A laser level will make this part a little easier, but if you don’t have one, a regular level will work as well.
Step 2: Check the tracks with a level to make sure they're properly aligned. Horizontal tracks should slant slightly down toward the back of the garage; with roll-up doors, the vertical sections of track should be exactly plumb. Both tracks must be at the same height on the garage walls. If the tracks are not properly aligned, loosen but do not remove the screws or bolts that hold the mounting brackets, and tap the tracks carefully into position. Recheck the tracks with the level to make sure they're in the right position; then tighten the screws or bolts at the mounting brackets.
2.4 The same is true of Older Overhead, BarCol and Raynor torsion springs that have winding cones with inconsistent hole sizes. If you insert a 1/2" X 18" bar in some of these holes you can move the opposite end of the bar over four inches. Bars in newer cones move less than 1 1/2". I've had many of the older cones spin loose from my bars, the last one generating an $1800 emergency room bill. If your cones are like any of these, or if they have more than 2" of play, leave the job of installing torsion springs to a professional garage door mechanic.
From a big-box store, basic garage door cables can run between $8 and $20, depending on the product. Your pro may charge you a different cost if they provide the cables. Your cables may not need to be replaced if they have simply come off the track, but broken cables will need to be completely removed and replaced. In either instance, the pros will need to secure or take down the door; unwind the springs; reset or replace the rollers, cables, and drums; and then wind the springs once more. For example, a pro could reset cables that have come off the track for $129.99. The average national cost for a garage door repair specialist is $80 - $110 per hour and the typical cost to replace a broken garage door cable is anywhere from $130 to $200.
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