Although garage door springs can break during any season and at any time, they most commonly break during the winter. This has to do with the temperature change. When the temperature sinks below a specific threshold, the metal will contract. This means it’s extremely possible for your door springs to shrink slightly during the winter months. This is hard on the springs and makes them more likely to break. http://m.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
If the door closes but then immediately pops open again, you'll need to check the limit settings, which help the mechanism determine how far to move the door in order to close it properly. If the settings are off, the door will hit the ground before the opener believes it should. It will assume that it has hit an obstacle and will automatically backtrack to avoid damage. Check the owner's manual or the buttons on the motor to adjust the limit settings. It may take some trial and error to get the setting just right. http://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c

They were quick, friendly, and highly professional. Little things like making me enter security code from the other side of the closed garage door revealed their attention to security They had to run to Home Depot to get a small block of wood to fix an existing problem with the door — They didn’t charge me extra. Quite unexpected & appreciated. 10 out of 10
When you're done watching this video you'll know how to determine whether the company you hired to replace your garage door spring installed the right size spring on your door. You'll also learn the consequences to your garage door opener if the wrong size spring is used. If you are having a problem with your garage door spring, the 2:30 minutes you spend watching this video is time will spent. https://youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c
If the door closes but then immediately pops open again, you'll need to check the limit settings, which help the mechanism determine how far to move the door in order to close it properly. If the settings are off, the door will hit the ground before the opener believes it should. It will assume that it has hit an obstacle and will automatically backtrack to avoid damage. Check the owner's manual or the buttons on the motor to adjust the limit settings. It may take some trial and error to get the setting just right. http://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c
Many jobs around the house are fairly easy fixes. It’s relatively easy to clean out your fireplace, clean the leaves from the gutters or repaint a wall. It’s a different thing to replace your garage door spring. It’s careful work that is almost impossible to do correctly the first time. Garage door professionals spend a great deal of time learning how to do it properly, and even the most detailed instructions won’t make you an expert in the span of a few hours. It can be almost infuriatingly annoying at times and is simply better left to professionals.
Inspect the area around your garage door to see if something is blocking the photo eye sensors. Then look at the tracks to see if there is any buildup on the inside. You’ll need to get a step ladder to look at the tracks on the top part of your garage, as it will be difficult to see from ground level. It may also not be a bad idea to proactively wipe down your garage door tracks periodically to prevent this type of buildup from occurring. Running a damp rag along each track should be enough to remove anything that’s lingering on the tracks.

Almost every garage door opener wall control unit has a lock button. The lock button is sometimes referred to as the “vacation button” because it’s usually the only time that it is used. By pressing the lock button, you lock out all garage door opener remotes. The purpose in doing so is to ensure that nobody gets a hand on one of your remotes – such as the one left in your car – and using it to break in while you are away from home for an extended period of time.
11.1 Many torsion spring replacement accidents occur from springs that are too strong. If the garage door stays on the floor by itself, remove the vise grip from the track. If the door is off the floor and the roller is against the vise grip, close the door with one hand and remove the vise grip with the other. If the springs are too strong, you have to restrain it from flying into the open position.
The material and style of your door as well as the replacement parts needed will impact the total cost of your project. It would cost less to install a steel door with no opener then it would to install a wood door with an opener etc… High tech doors come with enery-effecient glaze and thick insualation as well as finshed interiors and other upgrades. These doors are more expensive but are more reliable and durable.
When a garage door service company gets a phone call in reference to a broken spring, the first thing the homeowner usually says is “the cables are broken”. This makes sense because the cables on a garage door will fly every which way, fall to the ground, become disconnected from the door, or even get caught in between the garage door and the jamb. It is rare for cables to break or need replacing when a garage door spring breaks. If your garage door has two torsion springs, the second spring will keep the cables tight and on the drums. You will have to look up at the springs to determine if one is broken.
R-value describes the power of the insulation in your door. The higher the r-value, the stronger the insulation. Those doors will have better energy efficiency than doors that have a low r-value. Basic doors have an r-value of 0.0 with no insulation. The first step up gives you 1-3/8” insulation at a 6.5 rating. Next, a 1-3/8” thickness with Intellicore has a 12.9 r-value. The best option on the market is the 18.4 r-value, which has 2” Intellicore insulation.
Rolling sectional overhead garage door spring replacement should cost somewhere between $195 to $300 for a quality set springs (50000 cycle rating). This price will very if the garage door repair company charges a service call fee (trip charge). The most important thing to consider along with price is the quality of the springs and the warranty. There are any company that we use lower or mid quality springs and charge on the higher end because they include a lifetime warranty on the springs. The catch is that this warranty will only covers the spring for life and labor only for 30 days to a year. Look for a company that offers a equal parts and labor warranty. This insures that the warranty represents the rating of the springs that are being installed. For instants, you may buy a 1500 cycle rated spring set (last 3 years +or-) for $200 with a lifetime warranty and 1 year on labor. When a spring brakes after 3 year the spring its self is covered but the labor cost to replace the warranty spring can be between $65 to $100. This can add up over the year as the warranty will not restart at the time of the warranty replacement. On the offer hand, if you purchase a set of springs rated at 50000 cycles (last 10 year +or-) for $270 with a 10 year parts and labor warranty and a spring brakes in 8 years it would be replace at $0 cost. A must batter value! Always check service company review and get the details on the quality of springs a garage door repair company uses and the warranty, part and "labor".
Sometimes, you’ll notice that your garage door closes all the way and then immediately goes back up instead of staying in the closed position. This issue usually arises with brand new garage doors that were just installed or older models that may need to be reset. If this happens, the most likely culprit is the open and close limit settings of your garage door opener.
Thank you, thank you, thank you for sharing your knowledge. I just replaced our shower cartridge and our leak is FIXED!!!!!!! Your instructional was clear and concise. I did purchase 2 cartridges first, because I did not know the type it was and could not pull it out without the plastic cover it comes with. Fortunately, it was one of the two. By the way I'm a 63 year old woman. If I can do it, anyone with internet and a little patience and an hour can do it.....
CAUTION! Replacing garage door torsion springs is dangerous because the springs are under tension. If you do not use the right tools and follow safe procedures, you could lose hands, limbs or even your life. You could also damage property. We want your business, but not at the expense of your well being. Doing the job right is your responsibility. If you have any doubts about your ability to safely change your springs, we recommend you hire a professional to repair your garage door. Safety First! Then work.

If you have a garage door opener and you suspect a spring has broken, do not disconnect the opener from the door (by pulling the red emergency release handle) while the door is open. If you do, the door can come crashing down under its nearly full weight, with nothing to stop it. This is an extremely dangerous situation. It is never safe to leave the door open when a spring has broken because someone might try to close the door without realizing how heavy it is. Or, they might pull the emergency release handle on the opener.
The following instructions for replacing garage door springs are for do-it-yourself homeowners and for maintenance repair men who service their smaller commercial or industrial sectional overhead doors. These directions are designed for torsion springs mounted to both sides of an anchor bracket above the middle of the garage door as pictured above. Instructions for replacing a single torsion spring, for replacing garage door extension springs, and for replacing Wayne Dalton Torquemaster springs are linked to our DIY Instructions page above. You'll also find a link for any other garage door parts you may need while repairing your door.
The new opener was installed yesterday and today for a while it wouldn't close properly. The customer service representative said they will probably have to reverse the sensors. However, no one could come out today (Friday) or tomorrow. She will call me by Tuesday of next week to schedule someone to come here. The customer service rep. and the technician were nice but as of now, my new garage opener is not working to my satisfaction.
We have had many concerns with our garage opener unit both safety issue and sleepless nights. At this time we are pleased that so far the unit is operating as it should.Hopefully we hope the issue of the unit opening by it self at early morning hours is solved. And if this is so, we want to Thank all involve in bring a satisfactory solution to this nightmare.
I purchased a garage door and opener and had HD install it. It was around $3600 and when the price increased by about $800 I called right away to pay it with no delay (these are all estimates written from memory). Anyway, I I bought the garage so that the front of the house would be prettier and it is but the old garage worked fine and I don’t even have a car in it so I don’t open and close it all and it actually only gets opened 2-3 times a month when a friend who stores their car there uses it. However, soon after the garage was installed, this friend told me the garage was working intermittently. When I called HD to come look at it, they said I would have to pay around $85 to have it looked at which didn’t make sense to me since it was brand new and almost immediately not working so it was likely a problem with the product or installation. HD would not provide immediate assistance to fix the problem, they insisted other steps which were unreasonable given it was a new garage and this request added great difficulty for me. Five months later after this back and forth calling to have someone from HD to just come and fix it, I went into the Huntington Beach store, spoke with Ryan who was polite and with little to say, he said I’ll put you on the list for an appointment and they will call in 24-48 to book a day and time. I was thankful. I also expressed my concern that I would not be charged for this visit and he said no unless it wasn’t covered under warranty. Two days later the installer called and said it will cost to around $95 just to show up. They arrived later that week, charged $95 and fixed the problem with no additional fee. If the garage was being used the way most garages are used and it was out of warranty, I could understand for a fee to cone out and look at it but because it stopped working almost Immediately and all the fuss and delay to have it fixed by HD was disappointing. When you gave me a quote then raised it by 20%% I paid immediately and without hesitation but this service was not reciprocated. I may have multiple projects at multiple sites but even if that weren’t the case, I would hope you would keep up your good costumer service history otherwise, your competitors willl slowly be better. Kindly return the fee charged for this service. Read less
The winding and unwinding is done at a metal fitting, called a _winding cone_, attached to the outside end of the spring. You stick a winding bar into one of the four holes in the cone and use the bar as a lever to turn the cone. Once you've completed a quarter turn, insert the other bar into a different hole in the cone and let the bar lever against the closed garage door to hold the spring tension. This allows you to move the original bar to repeat the process, alternating the bars with each quarter-turn. It takes about 30 quarter-turns to fully tension a standard torsion spring.
While many sites may encourage you to save on garage door replacement costs by installing the door yourself, this is severely discouraged due to safety concerns and the installation techniques and tools required to properly and efficiently replace a garage door. When installing a new garage door, the range of prices also includes the labor performed by the professional garage door technician. These costs can include:
However, if you lose power and use the disconnect switch, you’ll need to reattach it to use your garage door motor to open and close your door again. Open the door all the way and then reattach this hook. Then try opening or closing the door again with your transmitter, and you should be all set. It will be easiest to reattach this hook when your car is not in the garage, as you’ll need to place a step ladder underneath the motor to reach it.
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