Inspect the area around your garage door to see if something is blocking the photo eye sensors. Then look at the tracks to see if there is any buildup on the inside. You’ll need to get a step ladder to look at the tracks on the top part of your garage, as it will be difficult to see from ground level. It may also not be a bad idea to proactively wipe down your garage door tracks periodically to prevent this type of buildup from occurring. Running a damp rag along each track should be enough to remove anything that’s lingering on the tracks.


Install the center bearing and the right spring, then secure the cones. Slide the torsion bar to the left then add the center bearing. Slide the right spring onto the bar and press the bearing into the stationary cone. Connect both of the stationary cones to the center bracket with the nuts and bolts you removed previously. Remove the locking pliers or clamp from the center bracket.[10]
So if you’re worried that your door may be becoming more energy inefficient or if you’ve noticed a sudden spike in your heating costs, look at the weather stripping on your garage door. While you can replace it yourself, remember that effective weather stripping requires a tight seal, so if you’re unsure, you might save money in the long run by going with a professional garage door service 

Order replacement springs. Many manufacturers and distributors only provide torsion springs to professionals, and won’t sell them directly to the customer. Luckily, they are available on the Internet, so search online to find replacement springs. Make sure they match the coil size, length, and interior diameter of the springs you removed. Also, be sure to order both a “left-hand” and a “right-hand” spring as the coils are wound in different directions.[8]
It you have a tilt-up door, you are looking at a $150 – $200 repair or replacement. If it’s a roll-up door it’s going to cost you more. Roll-up door spring repair or replacement is usually around $200 – $250 for a 2 car door. If the brackets need to be disassembled to remove the springs due to the shaft not sliding sideways enough it will cost you an additional $50 – $100.
The following instructions for replacing garage door springs are for do-it-yourself homeowners and for maintenance repair men who service their smaller commercial or industrial sectional overhead doors. These directions are designed for torsion springs mounted to both sides of an anchor bracket above the middle of the garage door as pictured above. Instructions for replacing a single torsion spring, for replacing garage door extension springs, and for replacing Wayne Dalton Torquemaster springs are linked to our DIY Instructions page above. You'll also find a link for any other garage door parts you may need while repairing your door.

2.3 Beware of older winding cones. These older Crawford and McKee torsion spring cones were made for 5/8" bars. Sometimes, however, the holes are too small for 5/8" bars. Whatever you do, don't use a 1/2" bar; instead, grind down a 5/8" bar to fit. I recently had a McKee spring let loose after winding because I used a 1/2" bar when my 5/8" bar wouldn't fit. Just before it let loose I was telling myself, "This is not safe." And it wasn't. The only safe way to replace these older springs is to make a winding bar for each hole of each cone.

Because garage doors are large, heavy, and mildly complicated, most people who buy them take advantage of these services. But, if you’re pretty adept at DIY tasks, you can save some money and enjoy the satisfaction of doing the job of installing a sectional garage door yourself. (Sectional garage doors travel up and down on rollers that ride along tracks at each side of the garage doorway.)

Garage Door Repair Estimates Centennial 80016


We lead busy and sometimes hectic lives. It’s easy for someone low on sleep and high on stress to accidentally bump into their garage door leaving a little damage. If you’re lucky it’s just an individual garage door panel that’s been damaged. This will leave you with the option of garage door panel replacement. There’s a chance it might cost you upwards of $150-200 to spot repair damaged garage door panel. If it happens to be an in-production model, they probably will be able to repair or replace the entire panel (if needed) for $250-400. Unfortunately if you’ve got an older model of garage door the panels may no longer be in production. This might seem like a disadvantage because you’ll end up having to just replace the entire door. Many times it’s actually easier and more cost effective to just replace the garage door.


Garage door springs don’t require extensive care and maintenance. However, they also can’t be left entirely to their own devices. Spraying the springs with WD-40 is a good place to start. It’s also a good idea to check the balance of the garage door every year. To do this, simply lift the garage door up about halfway and let go. If the springs are in good working condition, the door should remain still. If the springs are beginning to weaken, the door might sag or fall. By taking these basic steps, you can preserve your door springs for longer.


Step 5: Check for loose hardware, and tighten as needed. On swing-up doors, check the plates where the spring is mounted to be sure the screws are tight, and tighten any loose screws. On roll-up doors, check the hinges that hold the sections of the door together; tighten any loose screws, and replace any damaged hinges. Sagging at one side of the door can often be corrected by servicing the hinges. If a screw hole is enlarged, replace the screw with a longer one of the same diameter, and use a hollow fiber plug, dipped in carpenters' glue, with the new screw. If the wood is cracked at a hinge, remove the hinge and fill the cracks and the screw holes with wood filler. Let the filler dry and then replace the hinge. If possible, move the hinge onto solid wood.

If you need to leave the door open until you can make repairs, block the door track on both sides so the door can't move, and unplug the garage door opener (if you have one). If you want to close the door, you can try closing it with the opener, making sure there's nothing in the door's path in case something goes wrong. However, this will put some strain on the opener. Alternatively, you can have a few strong helpers hold the door while you disconnect it from the opener and carefully close the door manually—again, it will be very heavy.
However, if you lose power and use the disconnect switch, you’ll need to reattach it to use your garage door motor to open and close your door again. Open the door all the way and then reattach this hook. Then try opening or closing the door again with your transmitter, and you should be all set. It will be easiest to reattach this hook when your car is not in the garage, as you’ll need to place a step ladder underneath the motor to reach it.
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