Step 5: Check for loose hardware, and tighten as needed. On swing-up doors, check the plates where the spring is mounted to be sure the screws are tight, and tighten any loose screws. On roll-up doors, check the hinges that hold the sections of the door together; tighten any loose screws, and replace any damaged hinges. Sagging at one side of the door can often be corrected by servicing the hinges. If a screw hole is enlarged, replace the screw with a longer one of the same diameter, and use a hollow fiber plug, dipped in carpenters' glue, with the new screw. If the wood is cracked at a hinge, remove the hinge and fill the cracks and the screw holes with wood filler. Let the filler dry and then replace the hinge. If possible, move the hinge onto solid wood.
"Springs get a lot of wear and tear because they handle the weight of the door," says Paul Cardone, owner of Garage Door Guru in Charlotte, North Carolina. "The type of spring you have depends on the type of door you have — the heavier the door, the more heavy duty the spring. They're full of tension and made of metal, so after so many cycles, they just snap and break."
The new opener was installed yesterday and today for a while it wouldn't close properly. The customer service representative said they will probably have to reverse the sensors. However, no one could come out today (Friday) or tomorrow. She will call me by Tuesday of next week to schedule someone to come here. The customer service rep. and the technician were nice but as of now, my new garage opener is not working to my satisfaction.

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Gather the supplies and tools needed for changing the springs safely. In addition to the torsion springs you'll need a minimum of one or two 10" vise grips, an adjustable wrench, and two 1/2" X 18" winding bars. Most hardware stores sell 1/2" X 36" steel rods that can be cut in half. You'll also need a firm ladder and a rag for cleaning your hands. A ruler and a file may also be necessary; a socket wrench and sockets would shorten the time required. Finally, make sure your garage is lighted well.
While a new coat of paint can go a long way in improving the look of your garage door, the truth is that door design has come a long way in the years since garages were first installed in homes. Not only are newer doors more in line with current fashion trends, but they are also better sized for today’s cars. A new, contemporary door is a great way to get an immediate boost on the value of your home.
We are proud of the work we do in Northwestern North Carolina. We love this community and we love serving it. So whether you think you need a small repair or a major overhaul, we want to be the team that helps you increase the value of your home while making it a safer place to live for you and your family. Our professional and friendly sales team are eager to connect with you, so contact us today and find out just how we can ease your concerns and make transform your garage! http://m.youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c
Both types of springs are _loaded_, or under tension, when the door is closed. This gives them stored energy to help lift the door as it's being opened. When the door is all the way up, the springs are relaxed, or relatively so—they still may be under some tension. The mechanical difference between extension and torsion springs is that extension springs are loaded by stretching, or elongating, while torsion springs are loaded by twisting, creating torque.

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Unlike torsion springs, replacing extension springs has long been given the "green light" for DIYers, primarily because you can complete the job without having to deal with spring tension. The general process is simple and safe: open the door to relieve the spring tension (and secure it open with C-clamps in the tracks); disconnect the spring from the track bracket and the spring pulley, and disconnect the safety cable from one end; install the new spring, reinstall the pulley, and reconnect the safety cable, and you're done.
It’s difficult to say how often the springs will need to be replaced since it’s different for everyone. It depends on how often you use your garage door, how cold and long your winters are, how well you maintain your springs and many other factors. The best rule of the thumb is to check your springs regularly for signs of wear and damage and to replace them when they begin to appear tired.
Determine the inside diameter of the spring and the size of the coils. Run a tape measure across the opening at one end of the spring. Carefully measure the inside diameter of the spring so you can provide the supplier with this information. Then, use a tape measure to find the length of 10 coils on the spring. Divide the length by 10 to determine the measurement of a single coil.[7]
Most garage doors from the past 15-20 years have a photo eye which detects if a person or object is blocking the door from lowering all the way. The photo eye will be about 4-6 inches off of the ground for most doors, with an eye that is about the size of a pea. It shoots a laser across the length of the garage that, if interrupted, will cut off the signal used to lower and raise the door.
9.14 Slide the springs to the bracket. Double-check to make sure you have the right wound spring on the left side and the left wind spring on the right side. Turn the springs until the ends are facing you. The wire at the ends of both torsion springs here at the bracket should be pointing down. At the winding cones at the opposite ends, the spring wire points up. If not, reverse the springs. About once a month we get a phone call from a do-it-yourself customer who begins the conversation with, "I wound the garage door spring to about six turns and the spring came loose from the cone." We normally refer them back to this step and suggest they switch their springs.
From a big-box store, basic garage door cables can run between $8 and $20, depending on the product. Your pro may charge you a different cost if they provide the cables. Your cables may not need to be replaced if they have simply come off the track, but broken cables will need to be completely removed and replaced. In either instance, the pros will need to secure or take down the door; unwind the springs; reset or replace the rollers, cables, and drums; and then wind the springs once more. For example, a pro could reset cables that have come off the track for $129.99. The average national cost for a garage door repair specialist is $80 - $110 per hour and the typical cost to replace a broken garage door cable is anywhere from $130 to $200. https://m.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c

If you use the correct tools and follow our instructions, you can rebuild the entire torsion spring system in just a few hours, without any side trips to the ER. We won't cover how to replace garage door extension spring systems in this story. But we'll show you garage door spring replacement on the more common torsion springs, the kind that mount on a bar above the garage door.
1. What Is the Issue? _________________________________________________ 2. Have they ever used our service? 3. Are they the homeowner? _________________________________________________ 4. What Date/Time Slot Did They Commit To? 5. Sometimes our technicians Can Run Ahead of Schedule or Behind/Open Availability Outside of Window? 6. IF Customer Was Unable to Commit to Full Time Block, Who Authorized and What Are There Restrictions [This requires approval]. ____________________________________ 7. Is this an overhead garage door or a barrel roll up door? 8. Are you calling about a new work order or existing work order? 9. Is this related to a home warranty claim or insurance claim? 10. Do you live in a gated community?

Refrain from parking your car in the garage until the garage door is repaired. Additionally, try not to open and close the door while it’s in this condition. With that amount of possible force coming from the springs or cables, they could potentially damage your vehicle or other property in the garage as well as cause serious injury. It’s especially important that you and your family stay away from these cables or springs until everything is repaired.


It you have a tilt-up door, you are looking at a $150 – $200 repair or replacement. If it’s a roll-up door it’s going to cost you more. Roll-up door spring repair or replacement is usually around $200 – $250 for a 2 car door. If the brackets need to be disassembled to remove the springs due to the shaft not sliding sideways enough it will cost you an additional $50 – $100. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
If your stuck garage door coincides with weather changes, you may need to adjust the pressure on the opener. Some openers have a force-adjustment mechanism that controls the force that's applied to operate the door. It's best to leave this adjustment to a garage door pro, as too much force may result in the door failing to stop when it should, posing a danger to people and objects in the door's path.
Start by disconnecting your garage door from the lift mechanism. This is usually done by pulling on a cord — often with a red handle — that is dangling from the lift. This will allow your door to move independently of your lifting mechanism. It’s also a good thing to know how to do just in case you need to open your garage door when your house doesn’t have power.
"That's the most common scam that's out there," says Jason Carter, customer service manager at Banko Overhead Doors in Tampa, Florida. "A lot of companies will tell customers they need seven different parts in addition to the springs, and charge them $500 to $600. We charge $225 to replace springs on a two-car garage, and that includes tax, labor and galvanized springs."
DIYers are generally steered away from working with torsion springs because installed springs are always under tension. To safely remove a torsion spring, you have to control the tension by holding the spring with a solid metal winding bar, then you loosen the spring from the rod and manually unwind the spring using two winding rods. The spring is potentially dangerous until it is fully unwound. By contrast, extension springs have little or no tension when the garage door is fully open.

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Our garage door broke 3 days before Christmas, trapping my car inside. We contacted our home warranty, and within 24 hours, Sears called with an appointment time for the next day! I was so impressed! I thought, for sure, with the holidays, we would have to wait. When the technician showed up, he was so friendly. Unfortunately, the repair was not covered under our warranty, but he was able to help us get a good deal on a new spring and still make the repairs that day before he left. He also gave us great advice on how to keep the spring lubricated so it would not break again. I felt like he really went above and beyond to provide great service. Since moving into this new house in August, we have used Sears for several things now, and have been very pleased with the service. It's nice to see that in an age when so many companies just put customer service on the back burner in order to meet their bottom line, Sears still really cares and makes their customers feel important. Thanks for taking care of us this Christmas!

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A garage door with aging springs puts an enormous load on a garage door opener, so another sign of failing springs is when you hear the electric door opener begin to strain as it attempts to lift the door. At this point, it is time to consider replacing the springs. Aging door springs can also break suddenly, a situation that can cause the door to slam shut violently. If you happen to be present when a spring breaks, you will hear a very loud sound like a gunshot, because the break usually occurs when the spring is fully loaded—stretched or twisted to its full tension. When one spring breaks, the door will suddenly feel very heavy when you try to open it by hand, and an automatic garage door opener may no longer be able to lift the door at all.
Loosen the set screws while holding each spring with a winding bar. Position a sturdy ladder to the side of the springs, rather than working directly in front of them, for safety reasons. Put on eye protection and leather gloves. Push a winding bar into the bottom hole of the winding cone on the outside of 1 spring. Use a wrench to loosen the 2 set screws. Keep a firm grip on the bar as the the spring will expand powerfully as the screws are released. Repeat on the other side.[2] 

Because garage doors are large, heavy, and mildly complicated, most people who buy them take advantage of these services. But, if you’re pretty adept at DIY tasks, you can save some money and enjoy the satisfaction of doing the job of installing a sectional garage door yourself. (Sectional garage doors travel up and down on rollers that ride along tracks at each side of the garage doorway.) 

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Good response time and service; Question - I googled to find the Sears Garage Door repair phone number. During the conversation, I was unsure if this was "Sears" or a "contractor service" or other service. I had to ask if this repair person was coming from "Sears" or an independent repair. I was concerned until the service man arrived in a sears truck wearing Sears apparel. You might want the process to be more clearly identified as Sears.
2.4 The same is true of Older Overhead, BarCol and Raynor torsion springs that have winding cones with inconsistent hole sizes. If you insert a 1/2" X 18" bar in some of these holes you can move the opposite end of the bar over four inches. Bars in newer cones move less than 1 1/2". I've had many of the older cones spin loose from my bars, the last one generating an $1800 emergency room bill. If your cones are like any of these, or if they have more than 2" of play, leave the job of installing torsion springs to a professional garage door mechanic.

If the door closes but then immediately pops open again, you'll need to check the limit settings, which help the mechanism determine how far to move the door in order to close it properly. If the settings are off, the door will hit the ground before the opener believes it should. It will assume that it has hit an obstacle and will automatically backtrack to avoid damage. Check the owner's manual or the buttons on the motor to adjust the limit settings. It may take some trial and error to get the setting just right.
When you're done watching this video you'll know how to determine whether the company you hired to replace your garage door spring installed the right size spring on your door. You'll also learn the consequences to your garage door opener if the wrong size spring is used. If you are having a problem with your garage door spring, the 2:30 minutes you spend watching this video is time will spent. https://youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c
Torsion springs do not last forever, regardless of what some companies claim. “Lifetime” springs do not exist – all springs have a lifespan. Most builders typically install the lowest costing door available and with that generally comes lower cycle springs. A torsion spring’s life is determined by the number of cycles the spring is rated to last. Whenever the door goes up and down is what is referred to as a “cycle.” The springs that builders install can last as little as 7,500 cycles which means the average homeowner could get 3-5 years of life.
Does your garage door stop when it is going up? Did you hear a loud bang, similar to a gun shot? Do the torsion springs above your door seem separated? If so, you might just have a broken torsion garage door spring. Torsion springs are located above the garage door and they are what lift the actual weight of the garage door. Most doors weigh between 150 to 250 pounds and without working springs, the garage door opener cannot lift the door. Attempting to use a garage door opener to lift a garage door with a broken spring can cause numerous parts on the opener to break.

The following procedures are based on my 30 years in the garage door industry. In spite of my high mechanical aptitude, even after 18 years in the trade I lost the end of my left index finger. A few years later I had five stitches in my right thumb, and a year later five stitches in my left thumb. In 2004 emergency room staffs dug steel out of my eye and sewed up my ring finger with eight stitches. The best I can do is help you minimize the risk of injury; that's all I can do for myself. I am not so naive as to think that I have made my last trip to the emergency room. Repairing garage doors, particularly replacing torsion springs, is dangerous work, whether you are a do-it-yourself homeowner or an experienced technician.


First and foremost, a garage door, by design, contains springs designed to balance your door and make it easier to lift. Those springs are under incredible amounts of tension. If a spring breaks or is improperly released, it can cause incredible and potentially fatal injuries. Keep in mind, when working on a garage door spring, it is likely that your face and head will be close to it, meaning that your most sensitive area will be in the direct path of the released spring.
Installing an overhead garage door requires a few tools and a friend to help. First, the lower door panel needs to be set up in the center of the doorway. The remaining panels and tracks are held in place with hinges, brackets, and screws. Set up an easy-to-install torsion spring system to ensure that your door lifts properly for many years to come.
Order replacement springs. Many manufacturers and distributors only provide torsion springs to professionals, and won’t sell them directly to the customer. Luckily, they are available on the Internet, so search online to find replacement springs. Make sure they match the coil size, length, and interior diameter of the springs you removed. Also, be sure to order both a “left-hand” and a “right-hand” spring as the coils are wound in different directions.[8]
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