The springs are an essential component to your garage door in that they enable the door to be lifted or lowered easily, despite its weight. If either of the springs are broken, then the door will become stuck. There are two types of garage door springs – torsion springs and extension springs. Torsion springs are located near the top of the door, whereas extension springs are located on each side of the door. If your garage door uses torsion springs, check for a gap between the springs to identify whether they are broken. If you have extension springs, look to see if a piece of the springs are hanging from the side.
10.3 At this point you will wind the spring. Notice that the end of the spring on the winding cone points up when facing you. You will wind both springs up and counter intuitively as if you are trying to unscrew the winding cones from the ends of the springs. Begin by turning the spring up 1/4 turn until it meets resistance. This is your first quarter turn. Count "one." Next, insert the bar and raise it 90 degrees. Insert the second bar. This is "two." As you wind the spring it should grow in length the thickness of one coil for every turn. The cone should cover your mark after the first couple turns. Many garage door tradesmen mark the torsion springs with chalk or paint, but this often generates confusion.
These instructions were first posted in 2005, and they were updated in August of 2008. I have been frank about the hazards of garage door repairs and about my own accidents incurred while replacing torsion springs. For what it's worth, you might be surprised to know that I, too, have benefitted from producing these instructions. I have not had any garage door accidents since we first published these on the web in 2005. And, in as much as I have helped keep other DIY-ers out of the emergency room, I consider myself somewhat of a medical practitioner.
Center and level the first section after you install the brackets. The door must be level even if the floor isn’t, so use shims under the section to level it. The rubber gasket on the bottom section will fill the gaps created by an unlevel floor. To hold the level in place, tape it to the section. To hold the section in place, lightly toenail a 16d nail into the frame and bend it over the section. Add brackets and rollers before setting them in place and stack one section on top of another, toenailing as you go up.
Both types of springs are _loaded_, or under tension, when the door is closed. This gives them stored energy to help lift the door as it's being opened. When the door is all the way up, the springs are relaxed, or relatively so—they still may be under some tension. The mechanical difference between extension and torsion springs is that extension springs are loaded by stretching, or elongating, while torsion springs are loaded by twisting, creating torque.
Product was received in two days and was as advertised. Installing these myself saved around $150 but it took around 2-3 hours. I would imagine everyone's experience is going to be different. These springs appear to be heavier duty than the ones they replaced. I couldn't use the same slots for tension as the old ones and it was trial and error in adjusting the length of my pull cable until the door closed as it should. I need to replace the springs on my other garage door and would think that will take less than an hour based on what I learned from the first install. https://youtube.com/embed/Z_eZc-kh40c
The problem is that one of the garage doors "catches" (i.e. stops) while going up at about 2 feet off the ground ~90% of the time. When the button is pressed again, it goes all the way down. This cycle can be repeated ad nauseum, or I can give the door a gentle tug upward just before the "Sticking" point, and this will give the door enough "impetus" to make it all the way up.

While you can certainly redo any security features on your garage door, it is often wise to replace the entire door if in fact that is the way a burglar gained access to your house. A new security code may seem like enough, but you don’t know how the thief figured out the old code in the first place. If the motor was disengaged, the issue might be a design flaw in the door itself. The best way to ensure that the thief doesn’t return or another thief doesn’t take advantage of the same unknown security weakness is to install a new door. Again, doing so with give you access to the kinds of robust security features that are being installed and implemented in the newest garage doors on the market.
9.9 Go to the other side of the garage door and insert the end of the cable into the drum. Rotate the drum until the cable is tight. Slide the drum against the bearing and push the shaft to the right. The marks should line up. If they don't, figure out why and correct the problem. It could be a stuck cable, the garage floor may have shifted, or the vertical angle that helps support the bearing plate may have loosened and shifted. Many garage doors have been installed with a gap between a drum and a bearing plate. The cable drums should always be flush against the race of the bearings.
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