While there are times you may be able to fix the problem yourself, there are many reasons it may be best to leave the garage door repair up to the professionals. Knowing what’s wrong with your garage door may help you to determine if it is a problem you can tackle or if it’s time to call someone for assistance. To help you troubleshoot your garage door issues, here are the top 10 reasons your garage door won’t work.


To evaluate whether the problem lies with the door or the automatic opener, make sure the door is in the fully closed position, then disengage the opener trolly from the door by pulling the emergency release cord. Try to lift the garage door by hand. If the door opens smoothly by hand, the problem is with the opener. If the garage door still only opens halfway, the problem is with the door.
"Springs get a lot of wear and tear because they handle the weight of the door," says Paul Cardone, owner of Garage Door Guru in Charlotte, North Carolina. "The type of spring you have depends on the type of door you have — the heavier the door, the more heavy duty the spring. They're full of tension and made of metal, so after so many cycles, they just snap and break."
Grab a tape measure and press the hook between two spring coils and note the length of 20 coils. Then measure 40 coils. Convert the measurements to a decimal (4-1/2 in. to 4.5 in., or 4-1/8 to 4.125, for example). Divide the two measurements by 20 and 40 to obtain the spring's wire diameter. Here's an example: 4.50 divided by 20 = .225-in. wire diameter; 9.0 divided by 40 = .225-in. wire diameter. If the two results match, you've measured correctly. http://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c
A garage door with aging springs puts an enormous load on a garage door opener, so another sign of failing springs is when you hear the electric door opener begin to strain as it attempts to lift the door. At this point, it is time to consider replacing the springs. Aging door springs can also break suddenly, a situation that can cause the door to slam shut violently. If you happen to be present when a spring breaks, you will hear a very loud sound like a gunshot, because the break usually occurs when the spring is fully loaded—stretched or twisted to its full tension. When one spring breaks, the door will suddenly feel very heavy when you try to open it by hand, and an automatic garage door opener may no longer be able to lift the door at all.

If your garage door isn’t operating properly, the torsion springs are likely to blame. If you’re concerned about tackling this project on your own, consider hiring out the job to a professional. Otherwise, replace both the left and right springs at the same time to save yourself from having to do the job twice. Remove the old springs and measure them while they’re relaxed. Only then will you be able to order replacement parts and install the new springs. Replacing your own garage door springs takes only a little time and effort and can save you hundreds of dollars.


Quite a few garage doors come with manual locks, especially older models, for added security for your house. These typically look like a knob or handle in the middle of your door with two bars running horizontally from each side. There may be a small button on the top or side of the handle that you can press to slide the bars across the doors, thus locking the garage door from the inside. It can be somewhat easy to accidentally hit that button, especially if you’re getting large objects out of the trunk of your car near the door.
So your garage door is acting up, but you aren’t sure what the problem is. Maybe the door spring is one possible culprit, but you’re not sure if that’s actually the problem or if it’s something else. In this quick list, we’ll go through the most common broken garage door spring symptoms. If your garage door is exhibiting one or a few of these symptoms, there’s a good chance it’s broken and needs replacing.
9.13 If you have a spring anchor bracket with a fixed steel bearing, check for wear at the point where the shaft and bearing race meet. The shaft needs to be free to slide sideways inside the bearing. File the shaft if needed. Lube the bearing. Notice that only one bearing is needed for two torsion springs. This bearing keeps the shaft from rubbing against the inside of the stationary cones and on the center bracket. Your garage door may not have a center bearing. If so grease the shaft where it will be rubbing the bracket and the insides of the cones.
If your garage door's spring breaks, stops working properly, or snaps, you'll lose the ability to open and close your garage door. This could happen due to a variety of issues, like normal wear and tear or from extreme temperature changes in a short amount of time. Spring replacements require a quick response from a garage door provider near you. Contact The Home Depot and a local, background-checked technician will respond within 24 hours. http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtu.be
However, if you are confident that you don’t just need new batteries, make sure to call a professional. A service person with a lot of experience will be able to look at the problem and quickly diagnose the issue, saving you precious time. Again, while you may be able to save money in the short term by taking a day off and troubleshooting the problem yourself, the amount of energy and time lost as you search out the issue will quickly surpass the cost of a professional repair.

Remove the clamps and pliers from the torsion tube and track, and lift the door about 3 ft. by hand. If the door springs are properly adjusted, the door should stay in place when you let go. If the door falls when you let go, add a quarter turn to each spring. Repeat if necessary. If the door continues to open on its own, release spring tension in quarter-turn increments until the door stays in place when you let go. Then reconnect the opener.


If your garage door is equipped with only one torsion spring, it will be much harder to get your door open. You will need to get 2-3 people to help lift the door up because the full weight can be anywhere from 150 to 300 pounds. We don’t recommend lifting the door when the spring break's due to the danger of it falling on someone. If you absolutely must get your garage door open, raw strength is what you need. When you get the door in the up position, use vise-grips or a c-clamp on the track below the bottom roller to hold the door in the up position.

First, make sure your transmitter isn’t stuck under something that could be pressing on the button. For example, your transmitter may have fallen under your car seat and the button is accidentally being pushed by something heavy rolling around on your floor. If that’s not the case, you may also need to check your transmitter’s frequency. It’s possible your neighbors could be running their garage doors on the same frequency as yours, and as they drive by, they’re opening their garage door along with yours.
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