Every modern garage door is built with a sensor due to a mandate passed by the government back in the 1990’s that required garage door opener manufacturers to install safety devices. To meet this mandate, most garage doors have a sensor installed on each side of the doorway. They are often referred to as photo eyes since their main function is to maintain visual contact with one another. If that visual contact is broken by an obstruction, then the garage door stops in its tracks. This is meant to prevent the garage door from closing on a vehicle – or even worse, a person.
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Step 5: Check for loose hardware, and tighten as needed. On swing-up doors, check the plates where the spring is mounted to be sure the screws are tight, and tighten any loose screws. On roll-up doors, check the hinges that hold the sections of the door together; tighten any loose screws, and replace any damaged hinges. Sagging at one side of the door can often be corrected by servicing the hinges. If a screw hole is enlarged, replace the screw with a longer one of the same diameter, and use a hollow fiber plug, dipped in carpenters' glue, with the new screw. If the wood is cracked at a hinge, remove the hinge and fill the cracks and the screw holes with wood filler. Let the filler dry and then replace the hinge. If possible, move the hinge onto solid wood.


Order replacement springs. Many manufacturers and distributors only provide torsion springs to professionals, and won’t sell them directly to the customer. Luckily, they are available on the Internet, so search online to find replacement springs. Make sure they match the coil size, length, and interior diameter of the springs you removed. Also, be sure to order both a “left-hand” and a “right-hand” spring as the coils are wound in different directions.[8]


I purchased a garage door and opener and had HD install it. It was around $3600 and when the price increased by about $800 I called right away to pay it with no delay (these are all estimates written from memory). Anyway, I I bought the garage so that the front of the house would be prettier and it is but the old garage worked fine and I don’t even have a car in it so I don’t open and close it all and it actually only gets opened 2-3 times a month when a friend who stores their car there uses it. However, soon after the garage was installed, this friend told me the garage was working intermittently. When I called HD to come look at it, they said I would have to pay around $85 to have it looked at which didn’t make sense to me since it was brand new and almost immediately not working so it was likely a problem with the product or installation. HD would not provide immediate assistance to fix the problem, they insisted other steps which were unreasonable given it was a new garage and this request added great difficulty for me. Five months later after this back and forth calling to have someone from HD to just come and fix it, I went into the Huntington Beach store, spoke with Ryan who was polite and with little to say, he said I’ll put you on the list for an appointment and they will call in 24-48 to book a day and time. I was thankful. I also expressed my concern that I would not be charged for this visit and he said no unless it wasn’t covered under warranty. Two days later the installer called and said it will cost to around $95 just to show up. They arrived later that week, charged $95 and fixed the problem with no additional fee. If the garage was being used the way most garages are used and it was out of warranty, I could understand for a fee to cone out and look at it but because it stopped working almost Immediately and all the fuss and delay to have it fixed by HD was disappointing. When you gave me a quote then raised it by 20%% I paid immediately and without hesitation but this service was not reciprocated. I may have multiple projects at multiple sites but even if that weren’t the case, I would hope you would keep up your good costumer service history otherwise, your competitors willl slowly be better. Kindly return the fee charged for this service. Read less

Garage door springs offset the weight of a garage door and allow the door to be opened and closed easily, either by hand or by an automatic garage door opener. The high-tension steel in the springs has a limited lifespan, and over time, the springs lose their effectiveness. Garage door springs come in levels of quality—they may be described as "10,000-use" or "20,000-use" springs, for example. This may sound like a very large number, but when you consider that a garage door might be opened four or five times a day, every day, every year, it becomes clear that there is a limited lifespan for these critical garage door parts.


You can choose from three basic types of steel door: (1) steel only; (2) steel with insulation on the inside; and (3) steel on both sides with 1-3/8 to 2 in. of insulation. Other features that add to the cost are thicker insulation and windows, especially insulated windows. The do-it-yourself tensioning systems also add a little to the door’s cost. Be sure to specify exactly what you want.
Delivered on time, with the products described: springs, winding bats, & plastic bushing. Quick install, but apparently I measured wrong, so these total length I bought was larger (which is good as there is less stress on the spring). However this did mean that I needed more than the generic rule of 30 1/4-turns of preload. I wound up with 38 1/4-turns per side for the door to balance when open 3' (per familyhandyman.com recommendations). Would definitely do it again.
Slide the left spring onto the tube and add the cable drum. When your new springs arrive, put the new left spring (the 1 with the end facing up and to the left) on the torsion tube, making sure that the stationary cone on the end of the spring faces the center bracket. After sliding the new spring into place, replace the cable drum and insert the torsion bar into the left bearing bracket.[9]
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