In need of garage door repair? Contact one of our many well-trained garage door repair professionals today to provide your garage door system with the recommended service and maintenance procedures for smooth and reliable operation. Our garage door repair professionals are here for you, whether you want to fix your existing garage door or buy a new garage door. Are you looking to replace a garage door spring, cable or roller or searching for 'garage door repair near me'? Use our distributor locator below: 
If the engine of your garage door opener isn’t working properly, then your garage door probably won’t be working properly. If your garage door gets stuck and you hear a grinding sound coming from the garage door opener, then there’s a good chance that there is an issue with its engine. That issue is that the main drive gear probably needs to be replaced. The main drive gear is most common of the garage door opener’s components to fail. It is a plastic gear that takes some know-how to remove and replace, which is why you should strongly consider hiring a professional garage door repair service for this particular issue.
Professionals can replace garage door springs in an hour or two. When you hire a pro, make sure to ask about the quality of the springs they will install. They may well offer several grades of springs to choose from, at a range of costs. Top of the line springs may be guaranteed for life, while economy springs can be expected to last perhaps five years under normal use.
It is precisely on those coldest days of the year when you most need and appreciate the convenience of opening and closing your garage door quickly. Sadly, that's exactly the kind of day when moisture and cold can conspire to make this difficult. Garage doors can and do freeze to the garage floor. Sometimes it is just a minor icy connection between the two that can be broken when you hit the opener button. If the door refuses to budge on the first attempt, though, resist the urge to keep banging on the automatic opener button. This is likely to cause a more serious problem with the garage door opener—including, but not limited to, stripped gears, broken springs, and a burned-out motor on the opener.

To evaluate whether the problem lies with the door or the automatic opener, make sure the door is in the fully closed position, then disengage the opener trolly from the door by pulling the emergency release cord. Try to lift the garage door by hand. If the door opens smoothly by hand, the problem is with the opener. If the garage door still only opens halfway, the problem is with the door.
Maybe the battery died or a spring broke, but you can't get into the garage to even see what the problem is. If the garage door is the only way in or out, or if you can't find the key to the door, you'll have to either find a way to break in or call a locksmith. As a preventative measure, it's smart to keep a spare key or install an emergency key release that would allow you to release the emergency disconnect to the operator so you can manually raise the door. https://youtube.com/e/Z_eZc-kh40c?app=desktop
9.12 It is now time to secure the torsion springs in the middle. For various reasons, many installers will offset the center bracket several inches from the center of the door. Offsetting the bracket makes it easier to work around the opener bracket without causing any problems in the operation of your garage door, but offsetting the bracket is not necessary. If you have a slotted center bracket, remove the vise grip and lube the shaft where it turns inside the bushing. Position the shaft so it is the same distance from the header as it is at each end. The shaft should be straight and parallel to the header.

6.13 Lower the second bar to the top of the garage door as you did the first bar. If your shaft is distorted inside the cone, you may need to tap the bar with a hammer as you unwind the spring. Maintain a firm grip on the bar; keep it firmly inserted completely into the cone; and be prepared at all times for the cone to slip, break, explode or snap loose from the shaft and jolt the bar down.


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7.3 Slide both torsion springs out above the top of the garage door toward the cable drums. Notice that there is only one bushing or bearing between the cones. Sometimes a single bearing is pressed into the bracket; other brackets have a single bearing or bushing that fits in either cone. Do not try to install a bushing or bearing in both of the stationary cones. You will risk breaking a cone. The purpose of the bushing is to keep the shaft from wearing against the spring anchor bracket. Only one bushing is needed to accomplish this.

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Doors with extension springs have two sets of pulleys (which are sometimes called _sheaves_): one at the end of each spring and one at the top of the vertical door track. They also have two cables on each side. One cable attaches to the bottom of the door, runs up and over the pulley above the door and around the spring pulley and then attaches to the door track bracket. The other cables are safety cables that run through the middle of the springs and are fixed to a track bracket at both ends. These cables restrain the springs if they break under tension. All extension springs must have safety cables. 

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6.13 Lower the second bar to the top of the garage door as you did the first bar. If your shaft is distorted inside the cone, you may need to tap the bar with a hammer as you unwind the spring. Maintain a firm grip on the bar; keep it firmly inserted completely into the cone; and be prepared at all times for the cone to slip, break, explode or snap loose from the shaft and jolt the bar down.
Nearly every garage door comes with a warranty of some kind. Many companies claim they have a lifetime warranty but don't cover everything. Garage doors have many parts: rollers, cables, springs, door panels, etc. Find out what parts the warranty covers. When you read the fine print, you may find that the warranty does not cover warping, splitting, cracking, denting, or rusting and then limits parts to one year. When shopping you want to make sure you are comparing apples to apples.
Install the center bearing and the right spring, then secure the cones. Slide the torsion bar to the left then add the center bearing. Slide the right spring onto the bar and press the bearing into the stationary cone. Connect both of the stationary cones to the center bracket with the nuts and bolts you removed previously. Remove the locking pliers or clamp from the center bracket.[10]
Slide the left spring onto the tube and add the cable drum. When your new springs arrive, put the new left spring (the 1 with the end facing up and to the left) on the torsion tube, making sure that the stationary cone on the end of the spring faces the center bracket. After sliding the new spring into place, replace the cable drum and insert the torsion bar into the left bearing bracket.[9]
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