Looking to repair your garage door opener? Common problems could range from issues with the remote or wall switch that control the garage door opener to more serious issues like a grinding noise coming from the opener itself. If you need help with repairing your garage opener, schedule a repair appointment today! We repair all major brands and have same-day availability in most markets, so we can get your garage door opener repaired and running smoothly. To learn more about the cost of repairing garage doors, visit our garage door and opener installation and repair cost guide.
If you have a single-car garage, an extension spring will do the job. If you’re looking for a smoother motion and an ability to lift heavier doors, you may be better off selecting the torsion spring option. And if you have a two-car garage, your door will likely be too heavy for an extension spring. In this case, the torsion spring is the better choice.
First, make sure your transmitter isn’t stuck under something that could be pressing on the button. For example, your transmitter may have fallen under your car seat and the button is accidentally being pushed by something heavy rolling around on your floor. If that’s not the case, you may also need to check your transmitter’s frequency. It’s possible your neighbors could be running their garage doors on the same frequency as yours, and as they drive by, they’re opening their garage door along with yours.
When a garage door service company gets a phone call in reference to a broken spring, the first thing the homeowner usually says is “the cables are broken”. This makes sense because the cables on a garage door will fly every which way, fall to the ground, become disconnected from the door, or even get caught in between the garage door and the jamb. It is rare for cables to break or need replacing when a garage door spring breaks. If your garage door has two torsion springs, the second spring will keep the cables tight and on the drums. You will have to look up at the springs to determine if one is broken.
I told several people that I planned on installing a garage door torsion spring after mine broke. ALL of them told me that it was too dangerous and a few feared for my life! Honestly it was one of the simplest home repairs I have ever done. That is thanks in large part to your very helpful installation video. Your videos on measuring springs etc. were also very helpful. All of the necessary details are there.

Garage Door Repair Images Centennial Co 80015


Radically beautify your home with wood carriage house doors. These doors increase the curb appeal of your home so much that real estate studies have shown they increase the value of your house. But that's not the real reason to have them... the real reason is just how much you'll love the way the exterior of your home looks... and if the neighbors are a little jealous, well, that just can't be helped.
Unlike torsion springs, replacing extension springs has long been given the "green light" for DIYers, primarily because you can complete the job without having to deal with spring tension. The general process is simple and safe: open the door to relieve the spring tension (and secure it open with C-clamps in the tracks); disconnect the spring from the track bracket and the spring pulley, and disconnect the safety cable from one end; install the new spring, reinstall the pulley, and reconnect the safety cable, and you're done.
10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode.
A standard double garage door is 7 ft. high by 16 ft. wide. Standard single doors are 7 ft. high by 8 or 9 ft. wide. Because the doors are so large, few home centers and only some garage door stores keep many doors in stock, so expect to order one instead of buying it off the shelf. Garage doors are available in wood, fiberglass and steel. Steel doors, like ours, are light, maintenance-free, affordable, readily available, and have an insulating value as high as R-19.
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