Nate was very courteous and professional and called to let me know that he was about 30 minutes from my house. I had purchased a new Sears garage door opener, but when Nate arrived at my home, he inspected the existing unit and told me that it was still in good shape except for a worn out part. Nate procured the new part and brought it to my home this morning. The unit was repaired in about 10 minutes! The existing unit was just over five years old, so I'm glad I will get some more use out of it.
10.13 Slowly pull down on the winding bar until the garage door rises 3" and the roller hits the vise grip on the track. The door will usually drop back down and raise the bar. If it doesn't, lift the end of the bar until the door closes. If the door comes up by itself when you hold the bar lightly, the springs are either over wound or they are too strong. You may need to remove 1/4 to 1/2 turns from the springs. If the door comes up on its own, you either have to many turns on the springs or you have the wrong springs. This can be very dangerous. We recommend getting professional help. Removing the winding bar could cause the garage door to knock you off the ladder.
There could be a few issues that might be causing your transmitters not to work properly. The most common reason could be that you’re simply out of range of your garage door. Each garage door and transmitter combo has a specific range it will function in. If you’re trying to open your garage door before you can even see your house, then chances are you’re just too far away. Try waiting until you turn into your driveway to hit your transmitter button, and you should have more success opening your garage door on the first try.
To realign the track, first loosen the screws that hold the track to the frame. Then, gently tap the track with a rubber mallet to move it back into the proper position. Use a level to ensure it’s perfectly straight. Once you have the alignment correct, tighten the screws securely to ensure the track won’t move and cause more issues when opening your garage door. You’ll need to repeat this same process on the other tracks as well, as these may also be out of alignment.

If you notice that the garage door opens normally but doesn’t make any attempt to close when the remote is pressed, the first thing you’ll want to do is visually inspect the photo eyes. Over time, these eyes can get dirty, causing the light from the beam to be blocked. They also can eventually become misaligned, causing the eyes to not match up on both sides.
Slide the left spring onto the tube and add the cable drum. When your new springs arrive, put the new left spring (the 1 with the end facing up and to the left) on the torsion tube, making sure that the stationary cone on the end of the spring faces the center bracket. After sliding the new spring into place, replace the cable drum and insert the torsion bar into the left bearing bracket.[9] http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
Garage door springs are part of the garage door, and they're the first part to check when the door doesn't work; they malfunction more commonly than other parts of the door. In fact, the door cannot open or close with damaged springs. They raise and lower the door using one of two different methods: torsion or extension. The traditional choice for garage doors is extension springs, which sit above the door's horizontal track. They're more affordable than tension springs, making them a popular choice among builders, but they have more exposed parts and are more likely to break than tension springs. For this reason, extension springs must have safety cables to support them if they break. Tension springs attach to the wall above the garage door and work by twisting spring coils around the shaft as the door moves. These springs can support more weight than extension springs and have fewer exposed parts so they last longer.

Homeowners have long been warned that torsion springs are extremely dangerous to work with and that replacing them must be left to a professional. But these claims are somewhat exaggerated. If you understand how they work, and you pay attention to what you're doing, you can replace them safely and surprisingly easily. Granted, they're a little spooky to work with at first (partly due to their reputation), but this is a good thing—you really don't want to forget that they're under tension. Thinking about every step — before you take it — is the key to staying safe.


In addition to the above styles, you may also consider doors that are unique and offer options to match your home's design. These doors can reflect styles from old world doors, with decorative hand-forged hardware and architectural glass options. They can be customized with gorgeous woods such as mahogany, hemlock and cedar; to contemporary and modern styles in materials such as copper, aluminum and iron. Precision will work with homeowners, architects and designers to help match your Garage Door to your home's unique style.

A standard double garage door is 7 ft. high by 16 ft. wide. Standard single doors are 7 ft. high by 8 or 9 ft. wide. Because the doors are so large, few home centers and only some garage door stores keep many doors in stock, so expect to order one instead of buying it off the shelf. Garage doors are available in wood, fiberglass and steel. Steel doors, like ours, are light, maintenance-free, affordable, readily available, and have an insulating value as high as R-19.
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