While it would be wonderful if door springs lasted forever, the reality is that the simple act of opening and shutting the door multiple times every day isn’t easy. It’s hard on the springs, even though they’re built to do it. Most springs will last for a while, but they won’t last forever. The regular wear and tear of endlessly opening and shutting the door breaks them down and eventually, they’ll need to be replaced. 

All measurements should be in feet and inches. Step 1, measure across the existing door or desired space for the width, then up and down for the height. The rough opening of your space should be the same size as the door. Step 2, measure the sideroom, which is the space beside your door. Measure the width of the left side, and then the width of the right side. Step 3, measure the space above the door, which is called the headroom. Measure the height of the distance between the top of the door opening and the ceiling. Step 4, measure the ceiling, which is called the backroom. You’ll need to measure the distance of the garage door opening toward the back wall of your garage. You should have 6 total measurements in all once you’ve finished measuring the space. Keep in mind that having an automatic garage door opener installed might call for additional backroom or ceiling space.
You may remember a time as a kid when you and your siblings would close the garage door and run underneath it as fast as possible to make it out before the door closed. Well, on any garage door installed after 1993, that’s no longer possible thanks to two tiny photo eyes on either side of the garage entrance. These photo eyes transmit an invisible beam between each other that detects if anything is in the garage door’s path when it closes. This safety measure is there to prevent automatic garage doors from closing on top of someone or something and causing serious injury or damage to property.

With garage door installation costs, these numbers also include the actual purchase of the new door and other hardware, including the tracks, adhesives, connectors and fasteners. Keep in mind that if these numbers seem extreme, garage door replacement and upgrades can yield, on average, one of the highest returns on investments for homeowners — with an expected 85 percent.


2. These springs do wear out over time – in fact, they are commonly rated with what is called a cycle life. The average standard cycle life is ten thousand cycles with each cycle being one opening and closing of the door. This means for a door that sees four cycles per day you might expect to replace your springs after somewhere close to seven years of use.
Garage door problems don’t have to mean the end of the world. Garage door repair is typically a one-day process and can be done for only a few hundred dollars. Common garage door repair requests include fixing slow or erratic garage doors, addressing strange sounds coming from the garage door or motor, fixing cosmetic damage such as dents or scrapes, repairing broken doors that are stuck open or closed, and troubleshooting inoperable doors.

Garage Door Repair Companies Centennial 80016


When you know you’re in range and the door still won’t open, check to make sure the antenna is hanging down from the motor inside your garage and nothing is blocking it. Your antenna must be free from any obstruction to clearly receive the signal to open and close the door. Also inspect the antenna for any signs of damage. If it looks like there has been damage to the antenna, you’ll need to call your garage door technician to come out and replace it.

We offer industry leading service performed by the best licensed professionals in the region. Whether you need springs replaced, a motor repaired or need a new panel on your door, our service workers will get the job done efficiently and effectively, ensuring that your door is back in working order as soon as possible. We also offer a wonderful preventative maintenance program. This is a cost effective way to ensure that you avoid future problems by having the small, unnoticed issues addressed right away.


Sometimes, it's not possible to repair the garage door springs, and the only option is to replace them. Replacing garage door springs costs between $200 and $300 for a professional to complete the job. This includes the cost of the spring, which ranges from $40 to $100 for a torsion spring and $5 to $30 for an extension spring. Labor rates for this work average between $45 and $65, depending on the company and the region. The price can also go up or down depending on the type of door. Replacing the springs on a tilt-up garage door costs between $150 and $200, which is slightly lower than the same work on a roll-up garage door, which typically costs between $200 and $250.

You can choose from three basic types of steel door: (1) steel only; (2) steel with insulation on the inside; and (3) steel on both sides with 1-3/8 to 2 in. of insulation. Other features that add to the cost are thicker insulation and windows, especially insulated windows. The do-it-yourself tensioning systems also add a little to the door’s cost. Be sure to specify exactly what you want.
Most garage doors from the past 15-20 years have a photo eye which detects if a person or object is blocking the door from lowering all the way. The photo eye will be about 4-6 inches off of the ground for most doors, with an eye that is about the size of a pea. It shoots a laser across the length of the garage that, if interrupted, will cut off the signal used to lower and raise the door.
9.4 Slide the end of the shaft into the end bearing plate. Tighten the set screws an additional 1/4 to 1/2 turns beyond the point you finger-tightened them. Add an additional 1/4 turn if you could not find the original set screw indentations in the previous step. Heavier wooden garage doors may require an additional 1/4 turn. Caution: Under-tightening the drums could cause the drum to slip and the door to cock or fall. Over-tightening the set screws could damage the shaft or drum, resulting in the same problems. This is a critical step.
My wife and I began having our custom home built in the fall of 2002. We were able to subcontract many phases of the build process & we did all the painting. A highlight of the building experience was choosing precast concrete basement walls (produced in a controlled environment) and installed with great results by one of the TOH partners (Superior Walls). We got that idea based on watching a TOH episode on PBS a few years prior. It was quite the sight for our neighbors and us as the oversize flat bed truck arrived with an overhead crane and began the process of wall installation. It was kind of scary as the the wall sections were put in place. But without the TOH episode and the TOH seal of approval giving us confidence for the precast walls we would have chosen having the concrete walls poured on site. We have uncertain weather conditions here in Western NY during the late fall season. Who knows how pouring the walls on site would have gone. Thank you TOH for the precast wall episodes.
Annual maintenance. Make an annual check of all nuts and bolts on rails and rollers to make sure they’re firmly tightened. Check the condition of all cables to make sure they’re not worn or frayed. Lubricate rollers and springs with a garage-door lubricant (see How to Fix a Noisy Garage Door for maintenance and problem-solving tips). The door should operate smoothly and be properly balanced. Check the balance by disconnecting the opener and lowering the door halfway- the door should hold its position. If it doesn’t, adjust the spring tension or replace the springs.

In order to prevent injury, garage doors automatically reverse if they come into contact with an obstacle. When the door closes halfway but then reverses for no apparent reason, this may be a sign that there is something preventing it from closing, something that you can't see. Check the tracks for stuff like dirt, rocks, bits of trash, or other debris. Give the tracks a wipe-down to dislodge anything that might be getting in the way.
Unlike torsion springs, replacing extension springs has long been given the "green light" for DIYers, primarily because you can complete the job without having to deal with spring tension. The general process is simple and safe: open the door to relieve the spring tension (and secure it open with C-clamps in the tracks); disconnect the spring from the track bracket and the spring pulley, and disconnect the safety cable from one end; install the new spring, reinstall the pulley, and reconnect the safety cable, and you're done. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c

NEVER use screwdrivers, pin punches or pliers handles to wind or unwind a torsion spring. Trust us: This is the best way to wind up in the hospital. Don't even think about doing this job without a proper set of winding bars. You can buy a set of professional hardened-steel winding bars for about $25 from online suppliers. (Garagedoorpartsusa.com and stardoorparts.com are two online sources that sell winding bars, springs and other parts.) Professional winding bars work with 1/2-in. and 7/16-in. winding cones. If your winding cones have 1/2-in. openings, you can make your own winding bars by cutting a 36-in. length of 1/2-in.-diameter round bar stock in half (buy round bar stock from any hardware or home center). Just file a smooth bevel on each end so it slides into the winding cone holes easier.
2.1 Two important assumptions will help you execute this replacement safely. First, assume that the springs are going to break as you unwind or wind them. To avoid injury, clutch the bars firmly on the ends furthest away from the cones and stand securely on a sturdy ladder, not on chairs or cans turned upside down. Keep clothes and body parts away from the springs. Wear safety glasses. https://youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c

7.5 Slide both springs out toward the cable drums. This is often the hardest part of the job. You may need to file away swollen shaft, set screw burs, drywall or paint. If the shaft is distorted because the garage door installer overtightened the set screws, file the shaft, insert a bar into the cone and tap the bar with a hammer until the cone passes over the enlarged portion of shaft.
9.15 Install the bolts to secure the stationary center cones to the center bracket. Position the shaft here so it is the same distance from the header as the shaft is at each end. Finger-tighten the nuts until the stationary cones are flush against the center bearing plate. Forcing the cones by tightening the bolts may break a cone if it is catching on a bearing. Winding torsion springs with cracked cones can cause the springs to spin loose and the bars to fly. Secure the bolts.
You may remember a time as a kid when you and your siblings would close the garage door and run underneath it as fast as possible to make it out before the door closed. Well, on any garage door installed after 1993, that’s no longer possible thanks to two tiny photo eyes on either side of the garage entrance. These photo eyes transmit an invisible beam between each other that detects if anything is in the garage door’s path when it closes. This safety measure is there to prevent automatic garage doors from closing on top of someone or something and causing serious injury or damage to property. 

If you use the correct tools and follow our instructions, you can rebuild the entire torsion spring system in just a few hours, without any side trips to the ER. We won't cover how to replace garage door extension spring systems in this story. But we'll show you garage door spring replacement on the more common torsion springs, the kind that mount on a bar above the garage door.
It you have a tilt-up door, you are looking at a $150 – $200 repair or replacement. If it’s a roll-up door it’s going to cost you more. Roll-up door spring repair or replacement is usually around $200 – $250 for a 2 car door. If the brackets need to be disassembled to remove the springs due to the shaft not sliding sideways enough it will cost you an additional $50 – $100.
9.9 Go to the other side of the garage door and insert the end of the cable into the drum. Rotate the drum until the cable is tight. Slide the drum against the bearing and push the shaft to the right. The marks should line up. If they don't, figure out why and correct the problem. It could be a stuck cable, the garage floor may have shifted, or the vertical angle that helps support the bearing plate may have loosened and shifted. Many garage doors have been installed with a gap between a drum and a bearing plate. The cable drums should always be flush against the race of the bearings.
×