I am a relatively new homeowner and one of the first items that needed to be replaced was my garage door. I had the 1950s style with 2 separate doors and a support column down the middle . I bid out the work and OGD came in the lowest by far and provided a much higher quality door. I converted my door to a single door. Their team installed the support beam to brace the house and support the structure and installed the new door in a day. I had my first issue with door this week, by operator error. They came out same day and repaired the door and installed a keypad for me. I couldn’t be happier with the quality of the product and the customer service provided.

Does your garage door stop when it is going up? Did you hear a loud bang, similar to a gun shot? Do the torsion springs above your door seem separated? If so, you might just have a broken torsion garage door spring. Torsion springs are located above the garage door and they are what lift the actual weight of the garage door. Most doors weigh between 150 to 250 pounds and without working springs, the garage door opener cannot lift the door. Attempting to use a garage door opener to lift a garage door with a broken spring can cause numerous parts on the opener to break.
Determine the inside diameter of the spring and the size of the coils. Run a tape measure across the opening at one end of the spring. Carefully measure the inside diameter of the spring so you can provide the supplier with this information. Then, use a tape measure to find the length of 10 coils on the spring. Divide the length by 10 to determine the measurement of a single coil.[7] https://youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
Unlike torsion springs, replacing extension springs has long been given the "green light" for DIYers, primarily because you can complete the job without having to deal with spring tension. The general process is simple and safe: open the door to relieve the spring tension (and secure it open with C-clamps in the tracks); disconnect the spring from the track bracket and the spring pulley, and disconnect the safety cable from one end; install the new spring, reinstall the pulley, and reconnect the safety cable, and you're done.
While a sudden issue is usually easily repaired, a consistent issue that has gone unaddressed for months or years will likely require a total replacement. The problem is that garage doors have a number of heavy, powerful moving parts. If the door is working as it is designed, it can open and close hundreds and hundreds of times without issues. However, if there is even a small issue in the lifting mechanism that repeatedly influences the movement of the door, you will soon find that the damage caused over those hundreds of lifts can’t be fixed.

Thanks for asking for our input. I have enjoyed the 'Future House' episodes that you folks have created. And, I think that the amount of segments-per-season seems just about right - any more and it might begin to take the shows into an area that moves away from their core meaning (i.e. - home repair/rehab/construction, etc). Though, it's easy to understand how new and upcoming technologies fit well into TOH/ATOH's overall picture. Also, Ross Trethewey is a good sement host - very knoledgable and enthusiastic - and, as well, he gives the TOH/ATOH audience some 'younger blood' to continue forward with the show's traditions. My thoughts are to stick with 'Future House' segments.And, thanks for all of the good work you folks do in continuing to present to us each year such wonderful productions as TOH and ATOH, which we get to enjoy and benefit so greatly from!


Remember, a garage door is usually made of metal and pushed along a metal track. That means that lubrication is essential, especially in winter. Keep in mind that lubrication can harden and get gunky as temperatures fall, so make sure that the lubrication on your tracks is rated for the lowest temperature that you’re likely to experience in your part of the world. https://youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop
Grab a tape measure and press the hook between two spring coils and note the length of 20 coils. Then measure 40 coils. Convert the measurements to a decimal (4-1/2 in. to 4.5 in., or 4-1/8 to 4.125, for example). Divide the two measurements by 20 and 40 to obtain the spring's wire diameter. Here's an example: 4.50 divided by 20 = .225-in. wire diameter; 9.0 divided by 40 = .225-in. wire diameter. If the two results match, you've measured correctly.
Using your drill, add tension to the torsion spring. This system uses a single spring for a double door, but many manufacturers use two springs for a double door. The painted line on the spring acts as a gauge for the number of turns you put on the spring. To keep the bar from turning while you’re adding tension, attach a locking pliers to the bar on both ends of the spring. Apply lubricant for garage doors to the spring.
"That's the most common scam that's out there," says Jason Carter, customer service manager at Banko Overhead Doors in Tampa, Florida. "A lot of companies will tell customers they need seven different parts in addition to the springs, and charge them $500 to $600. We charge $225 to replace springs on a two-car garage, and that includes tax, labor and galvanized springs."

9.9 Go to the other side of the garage door and insert the end of the cable into the drum. Rotate the drum until the cable is tight. Slide the drum against the bearing and push the shaft to the right. The marks should line up. If they don't, figure out why and correct the problem. It could be a stuck cable, the garage floor may have shifted, or the vertical angle that helps support the bearing plate may have loosened and shifted. Many garage doors have been installed with a gap between a drum and a bearing plate. The cable drums should always be flush against the race of the bearings.
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