Standard torsion springs (about $40 each) have a service life of 7,000 to 10,000 open/close cycles. However, you can buy double-life (25,000 cycles) replacement springs for about $65 per spring. If you have a two-spring setup and one spring breaks, the second spring will break soon. So replace them both at the same time. To get the right springs for your door, you'll have to provide the supplier some details. Here's how:
10.1 It is now time to wind the new springs, but before doing so, I recommend marking the shaft just beyond the winding cone. This is a final step taken to assure that you have installed the springs on the correct sides of the center bracket. Torsion springs always grow in length when they are wound in the proper direction. If your spring does not get longer as you wind it, you are winding it the wrong direction probably because it is improperly installed. We recurrently get calls about springs coming loose from the cones at about 6 turns. If this happens, switch the springs.
8.10 Double-check to make sure you have the correct wind on your new torsion spring. On the left side next to the winding cone the end of the spring wire should be pointing up if it is facing you. Notice, also, that the cone is red which usually designates right wind. Customers frequently call and explain that when they get about six turns on the springs they spin on the cones. This is due to installing the springs on the wrong sides of the center bracket.
If your garage door is equipped with only one torsion spring, it will be much harder to get your door open. You will need to get 2-3 people to help lift the door up because the full weight can be anywhere from 150 to 300 pounds. We don’t recommend lifting the door when the spring break's due to the danger of it falling on someone. If you absolutely must get your garage door open, raw strength is what you need. When you get the door in the up position, use vise-grips or a c-clamp on the track below the bottom roller to hold the door in the up position.
There are knobs or dials located somewhere on your garage door motor that you can use to adjust the limit settings. The exact location and resetting procedures will vary depending on the brand and model of garage door you have. Your owner’s manual should have more specific information on how to adjust your limits. You may need to experiment with a few adjustments before finally getting the correct setting. If you find that adjusting the limit settings isn’t working, it might be time to call a technician to come and help get your garage door to stay closed.
In order to replace your garage door spring(s), you will need to find the current measurements in order to accurately replace the spring(s). This should take about 3 minutes and you don't need to remove the springs or loosen the tension to measure them. Our springs are made to be a bit flexible, so you don't have to get it to an exact measurement. 
To install a single new garage door it should cost between $500 and $800. They demonstrate that the average homeowner can usually tackle such a project in a nine hour time span and a professional will be able to complete it in roughly five hours. Should it be a DIY project? Not really, most housing experts point out that it is a two-person job, requires advanced carpentry skills, and even knowledge of household electronic systems.
Remember, a garage door is usually made of metal and pushed along a metal track. That means that lubrication is essential, especially in winter. Keep in mind that lubrication can harden and get gunky as temperatures fall, so make sure that the lubrication on your tracks is rated for the lowest temperature that you’re likely to experience in your part of the world. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=Z_eZc-kh40c
I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?
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