There are lots of ways your garage door can suffer damage. The tracking might be rusted or broken, the weatherstripping might need to be replaced or the door itself might actually be broken or have a hole in it. After all, garage doors are sturdy but not unbreakable. One component of your garage door in particular that will likely need replacing every so often is the spring.
If the garage door is broken or damaged, it can affect the feeling of the entire house. It’s not only an inconvenience, but it can also make your entire house feel less sophisticated and less functional. If you happen to be trying to sell your house, this can seem like a major detraction. Even if you’re only having guests over, you may feel as though you’re doing less than putting your best foot forward by having a broken garage door.
If your garage door's spring breaks, stops working properly, or snaps, you'll lose the ability to open and close your garage door. This could happen due to a variety of issues, like normal wear and tear or from extreme temperature changes in a short amount of time. Spring replacements require a quick response from a garage door provider near you. Contact The Home Depot and a local, background-checked technician will respond within 24 hours.
Unlike torsion springs, replacing extension springs has long been given the "green light" for DIYers, primarily because you can complete the job without having to deal with spring tension. The general process is simple and safe: open the door to relieve the spring tension (and secure it open with C-clamps in the tracks); disconnect the spring from the track bracket and the spring pulley, and disconnect the safety cable from one end; install the new spring, reinstall the pulley, and reconnect the safety cable, and you're done. http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=youtube.be&v=Z_eZc-kh40c

We arrived at a rental property and tried to open garage door to get our vehicle in so we could unload luggage, etc. Could not open from outside. Went into house and, from inside garage, tried automatic opener but this did not work. So in trying to open the door manually, I reached up and pulled on the red cord attached to a lever. What I could not see, and was not expecting, is that the rope was frayed through almost completely. The rope broke when I applied some weight to it, sending me backwards onto the floor of the garage.

When it comes to garage doors, functionality and safety are equally important in the eyes of Sears Garage Door technicians. Our associates know the importance of garage door safety and the hazards that a faulty garage door can pose for your family. To confirm that your garage door and opener operate safely, our technicians perform a 20-point safety check during maintenance calls and repair jobs. This safety check verifies that any repair work performed has been done correctly and that there are no lingering safety problems with your door and mechanisms. If our technician discovers any safety concerns, he’ll advise you on the best way to proceed with correcting the problem.


Received all items as indicated, I would recommend purchasing a metal center bearing also, other Than the plastic that this comes with. Install was easy and strait forward. hardest part was finding how many turns to tighten those springs?? I used a general rule of thumb of a full turn for every ft. Of door. 4 quarter turns equals 1 full turn. I found that 26 balanced the door perfectly. These springs seem a little smaller than what was there however, the coil itself is the same. (Pic) After installing, I recommend oiling the springs with some motor oil. This will help with rust and noise. Good luck with yours, it's worth the work for the saving!!

11.2b If the springs you installed are too strong, and if you wind the springs the correct number of turns, the door will not stay down nor half way. The garage door will be hard to close. DO NOT REMOVE MORE THAN HALF A TURN OF SPRING TENSION TO CORRECT THE PROBLEM. Here's why. If you remove 3/4 of a turn to get the door to stay closed, and then if you open the door, it will get heavier as you open the door, and once open, the cables will come off the drums. This could create as much as a day's extra work. It could also cause door damage and/or result in serious injury. Do not use the door! Get different springs!


In order to replace your garage door spring(s), you will need to find the current measurements in order to accurately replace the spring(s). This should take about 3 minutes and you don't need to remove the springs or loosen the tension to measure them. Our springs are made to be a bit flexible, so you don't have to get it to an exact measurement. 
As commercial and residential garage door service professionals, we’ve pretty much dealt with every issue you can think of when it comes to garage door repair. Even still, there are sometimes issues that continue to surprise us, like the tiny insect nest growing on the photo eye sensor or the tennis ball that somehow managed to knock the door entirely off its track. Even though these issues are uncommon, it’s nothing that garage door service professionals like us can’t handle!
While it would be wonderful if door springs lasted forever, the reality is that the simple act of opening and shutting the door multiple times every day isn’t easy. It’s hard on the springs, even though they’re built to do it. Most springs will last for a while, but they won’t last forever. The regular wear and tear of endlessly opening and shutting the door breaks them down and eventually, they’ll need to be replaced.
How much should a garage door spring replacement cost? The national average is between $200 and $300 for a professional to come to your house and replace two springs. On line sources suggest a higher price of over $700 and that you will save $500 or more by replacing springs yourself. This is simply not true. To find the cost for replacing springs in your area look for a reputable company through Yelp or the Better Busienss Bureau. If clicking a site's BBB logo doesn't take you to the BBB site, we advise purchasing your springs from a different company.

No matter what kind of door you are installing, be very careful. The instructions that follow are merely guidelines. You should read your garage door manufacturer's instructions and owner's manual very carefully before attempting either type of installation. And if you're a do-it-yourself greenhorn, skip this project and hire an experienced professional. It may be more expensive, but garage door installation is on the higher scale of DIY difficulty.
If your stuck garage door coincides with weather changes, you may need to adjust the pressure on the opener. Some openers have a force-adjustment mechanism that controls the force that's applied to operate the door. It's best to leave this adjustment to a garage door pro, as too much force may result in the door failing to stop when it should, posing a danger to people and objects in the door's path.
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