Your decision on whether to try and replace a broken spring may depend on what type of springs you have. Garage door springs come in two main types: extension and torsion. Identifying which type you have is easy. If your door system has a long, skinny spring running parallel to each horizontal door track, then you have extension springs. If your door has one or more beefy springs on a metal rod parallel to, and directly above, the door opening, then you have torsion springs. Both of these springs are found on standard sectional garage doors. If you happen to have an old one-piece, swing-up door with vertical springs at both sides, you also have a variety of extension springs, sometimes called side springs.
If the garage door is broken or damaged, it can affect the feeling of the entire house. It’s not only an inconvenience, but it can also make your entire house feel less sophisticated and less functional. If you happen to be trying to sell your house, this can seem like a major detraction. Even if you’re only having guests over, you may feel as though you’re doing less than putting your best foot forward by having a broken garage door. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z_eZc-kh40c&app=desktop
The following instructions for replacing garage door springs are for do-it-yourself homeowners and for maintenance repair men who service their smaller commercial or industrial sectional overhead doors. These directions are designed for torsion springs mounted to both sides of an anchor bracket above the middle of the garage door as pictured above. Instructions for replacing a single torsion spring, for replacing garage door extension springs, and for replacing Wayne Dalton Torquemaster springs are linked to our DIY Instructions page above. You'll also find a link for any other garage door parts you may need while repairing your door.
Lewis did a great job and not only met my expectations but blew them away. His attention to detail was impressive. He reolaced the springs on my two car garage door and he went out of his way to adjust the tension on my second single car garage door to make it open better. He also recommended replacement of the rollers on my main garage door as they were getting pretty worn out and making some noise. He was very friendly and personable. Was willing to explain what he was doing so we could learn something too. I would recommend Lewis Nagy if you are in his area here in Apollo Beach/Riverview. Thanks again!
9.9 Go to the other side of the garage door and insert the end of the cable into the drum. Rotate the drum until the cable is tight. Slide the drum against the bearing and push the shaft to the right. The marks should line up. If they don't, figure out why and correct the problem. It could be a stuck cable, the garage floor may have shifted, or the vertical angle that helps support the bearing plate may have loosened and shifted. Many garage doors have been installed with a gap between a drum and a bearing plate. The cable drums should always be flush against the race of the bearings. http://youtu.be/Z_eZc-kh40c
Garage door springs come in two styles: torsion (see above), which mounts on the header above the door, and extension (Photo 1), which floats above the upper roller track. In the past, extension springs were safer to install but didn’t have containment cables running through the center of the spring. Without cable, these springs become dangerous, heavy whips when they break. They also tend to be noisier than torsion springs, and we recommend you use them only if you don’t have the 12 in. of headroom above the door that a torsion spring requires.
The new opener was installed yesterday and today for a while it wouldn't close properly. The customer service representative said they will probably have to reverse the sensors. However, no one could come out today (Friday) or tomorrow. She will call me by Tuesday of next week to schedule someone to come here. The customer service rep. and the technician were nice but as of now, my new garage opener is not working to my satisfaction.
If you're like most people, your garage door is your primary entrance to your home. It's convenient to use and parking in the garage provides protection from the elements. Garage doors have several moving parts, including the door springs that help raise and lower the door. These springs do eventually break down, leaving the door inoperable. When this happens, it's time to repair or replace the damaged parts. This cost guide shows you what it costs to hire a professional to repair or replace any garage door spring.
There are lots of ways your garage door can suffer damage. The tracking might be rusted or broken, the weatherstripping might need to be replaced or the door itself might actually be broken or have a hole in it. After all, garage doors are sturdy but not unbreakable. One component of your garage door in particular that will likely need replacing every so often is the spring.

Garage Door Repair Cost Centennial Co 80016


The average lifespan of torsion springs is determined by its cycle count. Garage Door Medics provides springs with an average of 25,000 cycles and we can provide custom size springs for any door. The industry standard is 10,000 cycles. When a garage door is used more frequently, the springs may not last as long. If you begin to see signs of wear, it’s time to give Garage Door Medics a call!
7.5 Slide both springs out toward the cable drums. This is often the hardest part of the job. You may need to file away swollen shaft, set screw burs, drywall or paint. If the shaft is distorted because the garage door installer overtightened the set screws, file the shaft, insert a bar into the cone and tap the bar with a hammer until the cone passes over the enlarged portion of shaft.
While it would be wonderful if door springs lasted forever, the reality is that the simple act of opening and shutting the door multiple times every day isn’t easy. It’s hard on the springs, even though they’re built to do it. Most springs will last for a while, but they won’t last forever. The regular wear and tear of endlessly opening and shutting the door breaks them down and eventually, they’ll need to be replaced.

A garage door that has a broken spring has nothing to support its weight. The size of the door and the type of spring system determines how difficult opening the door will be. A garage door should not be opened until the spring is repaired. However, when you need to get your car out of the garage, it may be necessary if you cannot wait for the repairman. Use extreme care when opening a garage door in this manner.

Replacing a garage door panel can add significantly to the cost of a garage door repair. Panels run horizontally on sectional roll-up garage doors. They may be made of wood, vinyl, aluminum, fiberglass or steel. Garage door panels can become damaged from hail and other extreme weather, dents and dings, car accidents, and age. When deciding if you want to replace a garage door panel, it’s helpful to compare the potential repair cost to the cost of a new garage door. Panel replacement requires a pro with the proper tools as well as the new parts. With parts and labor you could be paying more than $500 for one new panel. In comparison, a new garage door may cost $800-$1,200 (on average) with installation. If there is a possibility your garage door was structurally compromised when the panel was damaged, have the pro assess whether it’s better to completely remove and replace the door, rails and framework to ensure your home’s safety. It may also be better to completely replace your door if it is severely rusted or dented; if the paint is peeling and fading; if the door model is outdated or you can’t find replacement panels; or if the panels or rails are structurally compromised.

Measure the various areas where the door will be installed: door-opening height and width, headroom (from top of opening to ceiling), and back room (length of garage). For the headroom, you should have about 10" to 12" of space, depending on the spring system you're installing. For the back room, you should have the door height, plus another 18" or more of space.

I was disappointed with the pressure of a tub and shower that were plumbed with 1/2 supply lines (2nd floor). Could be low pressure from the street, but I want to replace with 5/8. Plus, I'd like to have 2 back to back showers, one inside and one outside. So, I had intended to bring a 1 supply to both, then branch up to valves and shower head with 5/8. Finally, I thought pressure from the street was typically 55 to 70 psi and I am concerned if pvc can take that.Any thoughts?
×