Homeowners have long been warned that torsion springs are extremely dangerous to work with and that replacing them must be left to a professional. But these claims are somewhat exaggerated. If you understand how they work, and you pay attention to what you're doing, you can replace them safely and surprisingly easily. Granted, they're a little spooky to work with at first (partly due to their reputation), but this is a good thing—you really don't want to forget that they're under tension. Thinking about every step — before you take it — is the key to staying safe.
Your door’s torsion spring is located approximately one foot from the top section of your door when it is closed. It consists of two large coil springs, and is approximately the length of your arm. Its purpose is to balance the weight of your door so that a door weighing between 160 and 185 pounds is practically weightless to lift. As such, it makes it possible for a garage door opener to raise the door using only ten pounds of pressure.
Steel entry doors - when a garage is being fitted with new doors, it is also a good idea to consider a separate single 3x68 exterior door with half-glass and locksets too. These may require some carpentry, but they are a good way to allow for some flexibility in the choice of larger garage door, and can ensure that the homeowner will have more than a single way in or out of the structure. The average costs for such a feature range from $250 to $1000 each.
Slide the left spring onto the tube and add the cable drum. When your new springs arrive, put the new left spring (the 1 with the end facing up and to the left) on the torsion tube, making sure that the stationary cone on the end of the spring faces the center bracket. After sliding the new spring into place, replace the cable drum and insert the torsion bar into the left bearing bracket.[9] http://www.youtube.com/v/Z_eZc-kh40c&feature=youtube_gdata
7.5 Slide both springs out toward the cable drums. This is often the hardest part of the job. You may need to file away swollen shaft, set screw burs, drywall or paint. If the shaft is distorted because the garage door installer overtightened the set screws, file the shaft, insert a bar into the cone and tap the bar with a hammer until the cone passes over the enlarged portion of shaft.
The electronics should also be inspected before or after investing in the cost of replacing the garage door panel to make sure your door will operate properly. The sensors prevent the door from closing on someone's foot or a pet. If they don't work, someone could be injured. Also check to make sure the door opener works, since you could otherwise be locked out of your garage.
10.4 Raise the second bar 90 degrees and insert the first bar. This is "three." Continue winding. If the spring shortens in length, unwind the spring and switch sides - the springs are on backward. Otherwise, continue winding until you reach a count of "30." This is 7 1/2 turns, which is normal for most 7' doors. Longer life springs are wound the same number of turns. Newer steel doors with only one strut on top often need only 7 1/4 turns. On 8' doors count to 34. Each time you insert a bar into the winding cone, listen for the click to let you know the bar is in all the way. Not inserting the bar all the way could cause the cone to explode.

Garage Door Repair Guy Centennial Colorado 80016


Depending on the type and location of the damage you might have an alternative to replacing panels, or entire garage doors. One solution to give new life to your garage door is repair. Small dents, rot, rust or holes can be repair without replacing. Depending on what wrong with the panel, average prices for repair are $130 for steel door repairs, $190 for wood, $170 for aluminum and $150 for fiberglass. Garage door panel repair can save homeowners money, but should be weighed against garage door panel replacement. http://m.www.youtube.com/embed/Z_eZc-kh40c
10.5 If the spring comes loose from the cone at about 6 turns, you are probably winding the spring backward because the springs are on the wrong sides. Switch the springs. Otherwise, after winding the torsion springs, you will need to stretch the springs and secure the winding cone. First, mark the shaft 1/4" beyond the winding cone with tape or with a file. We stretch the springs because the shaft floats horizontally between the flexible end bearing plates as the garage door operates. Although this may be as little as 1/4" the binding of the coils as the door closes often keeps the door from closing completely, especially when the springs and bearings are dry and need lubrication.
The problem is that one of the garage doors "catches" (i.e. stops) while going up at about 2 feet off the ground ~90% of the time. When the button is pressed again, it goes all the way down. This cycle can be repeated ad nauseum, or I can give the door a gentle tug upward just before the "Sticking" point, and this will give the door enough "impetus" to make it all the way up.
A standard double garage door is 7 ft. high by 16 ft. wide. Standard single doors are 7 ft. high by 8 or 9 ft. wide. Because the doors are so large, few home centers and only some garage door stores keep many doors in stock, so expect to order one instead of buying it off the shelf. Garage doors are available in wood, fiberglass and steel. Steel doors, like ours, are light, maintenance-free, affordable, readily available, and have an insulating value as high as R-19.
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